Shi Hu, Dendrobium Nobile- “Immortality Herb”

This last May I was fortunate to travel to China with my school, East West School for Planetary Herbology, to do clinical training in a Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital.  On one of our field excursions, we toured a demonstration garden for the school.  In one greenhouse there were rows and rows of a low growing plant called Shi Hu. I found a piece of the plant on the ground put it into my pocket, hoping to root it when I got home.  At this point, I have a very small plant that made the long plane trip and is starting to put on growth.

Shi hu is an orchid plant that often grows adjacent to trees such as pear or peach.  The plant consists of a long, thin stem, which is golden yellow in color, with a flower at the end. Dendrobium Nobile, also known as the Noble Dendrobium or Shi Hu in Pinyin, has been used for the medicinal purpose for at least 2,000 years. Different varieties of dendrobium have different colors, but the most common colors are yellow and pink. The plant has a long thin stem that is used for various herbal and medicinal treatments. Shi Hu grows wild and is harvested from November to February although at this point, wild Shi Hu is overharvested and it is now being cultivated in greenhouses like the one we saw.  True Shi Hu refers to dendrobium orchid, but much of what is available on the market is a substitute rather than true dendrobium.  It is common to see products that are sold as “wild” Shi Hu, but this is a case where much of it is cultivated and not wild. Most frequently Shi Hu is available in bulk or granules. According to Eric Brand of Blue Poppy, the best way to test the quality of Shi Hu is to chew it. The more fibrous the less quality, the more sticky it is the better quality it is.

Shi Hu has been used for more than 2,000 years in traditional Chinese medicine.  In the Taoist Canon, a collection of Taoist literature from the Tang Dynasty (AD 618-907), it refers to Shi Hu as the first of nine “celestial herbs” with great health benefits.  In the Compendium of Materia Medica, written during the Ming Dynasty, Shi hu is described as affecting three channels of energy – the stomach, the lungs, and the kidneys.  The Chinese believe that the Dendrobium plant is ‘yin’ in nature and can be used to replenish fluids. It is commonly used as an Yin tonic to moisten the stomach, lungs and to replace kidney yin jing. It is very effective for treating conditions such as dry mouth, stomach pain, mouth sores, sunstroke, and other conditions caused by dry weather, pollution or smoke.

Let’s face it as we age we tend towards dryness and ingesting herbs that help to replenish fluids can be helpful.  Another reason that I love Shi Hu is that I often incorporate herbs into my soups and broths.  Shi hu has been used this way in Chinese cooking along with ginseng and chicken, duck, or lamb, for general health. Shi hu is now being adapted to new and creative uses including being made into juices and even dishes available at health spas. In a news article, I recently read, the flower of Shi Hu is made into a tea drink and even brewed into a clear liquor with 38 percent alcohol.

Among its many uses, the Chinese use dendrobium as a tonic for longevity. It is believed that when mixed with licorice roots and made into a tea it transmits healing energy to all parts of the body. There is a whole host of uses that are promoted in the commercial literature including the following:

  • Dendrobium helps moisten and nourish the skin and prevents dryness and flaky skin.
  • When air pollution and smoke dry out the lungs and air passages and increase thirst, dendrobium can be consumed for quick relief and to moisten the passageways.
  • Dendrobium is used as an effective tonic for the treatment of tuberculosis, flatulence, night sweats, anorexia, fever, and dyspepsia.
  • Dendrobium tonic improves the functioning of the lungs, kidneys, and stomach. It can reduce stomach pain and cramping and reduce vomiting.
  • It is believed that regular consumption of dendrobium can also treat sexual impotency.
  • Pain in the feet and hands, lumbago, and arthralgia can be treated with dendrobium extract.
  • Dendrobium can boost the immune system and help the body fight infections.
  • Dendrobium has long since been used to replenish lost fluids from the body and reduce severe thirst.
  • Natives of the Eastern Himalayas use dendrobium to heal problems with the eyes.
  • Dendrobium blossoms and stems are edible. Countries like Thailand and Singapore, deep fry these delicacies and eat them as snacks.
  • In Europe, dendrobium blossoms are used as edible cake decorations and as garnishes.
  • The Aborigines consider dendrobiums as emergency bush food.
  • Pickle is made from dendrobium flowers in Nepal.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine:

Energy: sweet, slightly cold

Actions: Generates body fluids for the stomach; nourishes stomach Yin, mildly nourishes kidney Yin; clears heat; brightens the vision; strengthens the lower back.

Uses:

Nourishes Yin, clears Heat and generates fluids Parched mouth, severe thirst or intractable fever associated with Yin Deficiency, most commonly when the Fluids are injured during a warm pathogen disease
Enriches Kidney Yin and reduces Heat from Deficiency Yin Deficiency Heat and depleted Fluids with a recalcitrant low-grade fever, dry and painful throat and a red tongue with no coat
Tonifies the Kidneys, augments Jing, brightens the eyes, strengthens the tendons and bones and strengthens the low back Dull vision, dizziness and low back weakness and pain associated with Kidney and Liver Deficiency
Nourishes Stomach and Lung Yin Stomach and Lung Yin Deficiency with Empty Fire Rising

http://www.americandragon.com/Individualherbsupdate/ShiHu.html

Additional Note:  According to Eric Brand it can trap an EPI (Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency) in the body and prolong the sickness. If there is a chance of EPI, Mai men dong or Yu zhu is a better choice.

  • Bensky D, Gamble A. Chinese Herbal Medicine. Seattle: Eastland Press, 1986.
  • Flaws B (translator). The Book of Jook. Chinese Medical Porridges: A Healthy Alternative to the Typical Western Breakfast. Boulder, CO: Blue Poppy Press, 1995.

Two Immortals- Help with Menopausal Symptoms and Hypertension

Er Xian Tang (Two Immortals Teapills)

TCM action: warm kidney yang, tonify kidney essence, and drain deficient fire

Last year one of my esteemed herbal teachers, Leslie Tierra, talked about the great results that she was getting treating women with Er Xian Tang who had yin deficiency with deficient fire. This peaked my interest and I started to look at the history and herbs that comprised the formula. In a nutshell, deficient fire is often seen in women who are experiencing pre and post menopausal symptoms which might include hot flashes, night sweats, facial and malar flushing, irritability, palpitations, insomnia, decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness to name a few.

The formula Er Xian Tang was developed in the 1960’s at a hospital affiliated with Shanghai College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Er Xian Tang was designed as a treatment for cases of hypertension (Western terminology) where there was a combination of kidney yang deficiency and deficiency fire of the kidney, two seemingly contradictory conditions. Yang deficiency include signs of internal cold and weakness including coldness, lassitude, edema of the legs, loose stools, sterility or infertility, frequent urination, urinary incontinence, while the signs listed above indicate deficiency of Kidney fire.

A comparison of the role of the heart and kidney in allopathic and TCM can be helpful in understanding the intent of the formula. Er Xian Tang treats renal hypertension.   Renal hypertension from an allopathic perspective results impaired functioning of the kidneys, reduced urinary elimination and excessive renin (a protein and enzyme secreted by the kidneys) production. The heart sends a continuous supply of oxygenated blood around the body. The kidney filters the blood, extracting waste in the form of urine, and also helps regulate the water and salt levels to control blood pressure. When the heart is no longer pumping efficiently it becomes congested with blood, causing pressure to build up in the main vein connected to the kidneys and leading to congestion of blood in the kidneys. The kidneys suffer from the reduced supply of oxygenated blood. When the kidneys become impaired, the hormone system, which regulates blood pressure, goes into overdrive in an attempt to increase blood supply to the kidneys resulting in renal hypertension. This eventually damages the heart, which has to pump against higher pressure, in the arteries.

In TCM Er Xian Tang treats kidney yang deficiency and deficiency fire of the kidney. In TCM, according to the five elements theory, the Heart is categorized as yang and the Kidneys are considered yin. Normally, the Heart yang (fire) descends and joins with the Kidney-yang to warm and propels kidney-yin (water) to ascend to nourish heart yang (fire) to prevent it from hyperactive. Think of it as a continual loop with fire warming the kidneys, while water helps to contain heart fire. Or as Western medicine describes: the heart sends a continuous supply of oxygenated blood to organs including the kidneys that help to regulate water and salt levels to control blood pressure. In both systems the heart and the kidneys are closely related, with a mutually dependent function. If this functional relationship becomes abnormal in TCM it results in a condition termed “non-coordination between the heart and the kidney”.

This gets us back to yin deficiency with deficient fire. In Chinese medicine, the Heart and Kidney energies should work together. The Heart sends Fire down to warm the Kidneys: in return, the Kidneys send pure fluids up to nourish the Heart. In Heart and Kidney Yin deficiency with Deficient Heat the downward action or upward action is severely reduced. This leaves too much Yang (fire), due to lack of cooling Yin (water), hence deficient heat, resulting in night sweats, insomnia, and steaming bone syndrome. Normally you expect to see symptoms of deficiency fire of the kidney associated exclusively with yin deficiency, yet in this case, this type of fire is described as yang excess which arises from an imbalance of yin and yang (the deficient yin can not control the yang). When yin and yang are both deficient, one can experience symptoms of each deficiency, which may either flip back and forth between the two or manifest simultaneously.

Er Xian Tang, Two Immortals

Xian Mao-Curculigo, Golden Eye-Grass Rhizome

Tastes and Energies: spicy-hot,

Category: Tonify the Yang

Actions: Warm Kidney yang and tonify Kidney essence,

Contraindications: Yin Deficiency w/ Heat

Yin Yang Hou-Epimedium Leaf

Tastes and Energies: spicy, sweet, warm,

Category: Tonify the Yang

Actions: Warm Kidney yang and tonify Kidney essence, tonify Yin, harnesses Liver yang,

Contraindications: Yin deficiency w/ Heat

Ban Ji Tian-Morinda Root

Tastes and Energies: spicy, hot, toxic,

Category: Tonify the Yang

Actions: warm Kidney yang and tonify Kidney essence,

Contraindications: Yin deficiency w/ Heat amp heat

Huang Bai-Phellodendrum Bark, Amur Cork-Tree Bark

Tastes and Energies: bitter, cold

Category: Clear Heat Dry Dampness

Actions: nourish Kidney yin and drain fire from deficiency, used for steaming bone disorder, night sweats.

Contraindications: Spleen Qi Deficiency w/ Cold

Zhi Mu-Anemarrhena Rhizome

Tastes and Energies: bitter, sweet, cold

Category: Clear Heat, Drain Fire

Actions: nourish Kidney yin and drain fire from deficiency, nourish yin and moistens dryness, generates fluids and clears heat.

Contraindications: Spleen Qi Deficiency, diarrhea

Dang Gui-Angelica Sinensis Root

Tastes and Energies: sweet, spicy, warm

Category: Tonify the Blood

Actions: Moistens and nourishes the blood and regulates the penetrating and conception vessels. Invigorates blood, moistens the intestines, increases circulation

Contraindications: Spleen Qi Deficiency, dampness

Er Xian San cautions:  during pregnancy, during early states of acute illness, loose stools, diarrhea, poor appetite or chronic digestive weakness.

The intriguing aspect of Er Xian Tang is that it contains herbs that are contraindicated (not used) in cases of yin deficiency with deficient fire. It contains hot natured herbs, Xian Mao, Yin Yang Hou, and Ban Ji Tian, which tonify yang but can also increase fire. The formula also contains Huang Bai and Zhi Mu that are bitter and drying, which may damage yin. Huang Bai and Zhi Mu are considered a traditional Dui Yao, or herbs that are often used together to reinforce and complement each other. Together they clear heat, enrich yin and drain deficient fire. Huang Bai is bitter, cold, consolidates yin, drains deficient fire, while Zhi Mu, is sweet, cold, enriches yin, moistens dryness, and supplements the kidneys. Dang Gui builds blood, increases red cell proliferation, normalizes heart contractions and dilates coronary blood vessels increasing peripheral blood flow. Huang Bai and Zhi Mu are cold energetically and help to balance the spicy and heating energies of Xian Mao, Yin Yang Hou, and Ban Ji Tian.

Er Xian Tang serves as an example of evolving TCM formulation, where a new formulations are being utilized to address modern disharmonies by combining strongly warming yang tonics with cold, fire-purging herbs. In this case and the studies that have been conducted the formula appears to be effective for hypertension and for some other applications, such as menopausal syndrome and male infertility.

Additional notes:

Xian Mao and Yin Yang Huo are used to tonify the kidney and according to the Taoist’s aid in prolonging life. The name “Two Immortals” references the use of the word Xian.   Xian Mao was named in the Bencao Gangmu (by Li Shizhen; 1596) as one of the herbs believed to contribute to immortality. Xian Ling Pi (Epimedium, now know as Yin Yang Huo) alludes to the immortals’ intelligent nature, boosts the qi and strengthens the will. Around 100 B.C., a poem about attaining immortality, the ode Yuan Yu (Journey to Remoteness, or Roaming the Universe) was written. It depicts the transition to immortality:

Having heard the precious teaching, I departed,

And swiftly prepared to start on my journey.

I met the feathered ones at Cinnabar Hill,

I tarried in the ancient Land of Deathlessness.

In the morning, I washed my hair in the Hot Springs of Sunrise,

In the evening, I dried myself where the suns perch.

I sipped the subtle potion of the Flying Springs

And held in my bosom the radiant metallous jade.

My pallid countenance flushed with brilliant color,

Purified, my Jing began to grow stronger,

My corporeal parts dissolved to a soft suppleness,

And my spirit grew lissome and eager for movement.

 

Tinnitus-Ringing in the Ear, Treatment Options From Many Traditions

The Western allopathic approach to tinnitus is dramatically different from either Western Herbalism or Traditional Chinese Medicine in addressing this condition.

Western Allopathic Medicine: Tinnitus is the perception of sound when no actualindex3 external noise is present. Tinnitus is a non-auditory, internal sound that can be intermittent or continuous, in one or both ears, and either a low or high-pitch sound. The sounds of tinnitus have been described as whistling, chirping, clicking, screeching, hissing, static, roaring, buzzing, pulsing, whooshing, or musical. The volume of the sound can fluctuate and is often most noticeable at night or during periods of quiet. Tinnitus is often accompanied by a certain degree of hearing loss.

Tinnitus can be either an acute or temporary condition, or a chronic health malady. Millions of Americans experience tinnitus, often to a debilitating degree, making it one of the most common health conditions in the country. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control estimates that nearly 15% of the general public, over 50 million Americans, experience some form of tinnitus. Roughly 20 million people struggle with burdensome chronic tinnitus, while 2 million have extreme and debilitating cases.

In general, there are two types of tinnitus:

  • Subjective Tinnitus: Head or ear noises that are perceivable only to the specific patient. Subjective tinnitus is usually traceable to auditory and neurological reactions to hearing loss, but can also be caused by an array of other catalysts. More than 99% of all tinnitus reported tinnitus cases are of the subjective variety.
  • Objective Tinnitus: Head or ear noises that are audible to other people, as well as the patient. These sounds are usually produced by internal functions in the flow of blood or muscular-skeletal systems. It is often more like the sound of a heartbeat or pulsating. This type of tinnitus is very rare, representing less than 1% of total tinnitus cases.

index2Some medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, certain antibiotics, and diuretics can be “ototoxic” or cause damage to the inner ear, resulting in tinnitus.

Other possible causes of tinnitus are:

  • Head and neck injuries
  • Loud noises,
  • Ear infections
  • A foreign object, or earwax touching the eardrum
  • Eustachian tube (middle ear) problems
  • TMJ disorders
  • Stiffening of the middle ear bones
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • Traumatic brain injury

There are also potential risk factors including the following:

  • Noise exposure from work, headphones, concerts, explosives
  • Smoking
  • Gender – men are affected more than women
  • Hearing loss
  • Age – older individuals have a higher likelihood of developing tinnitus

There is currently no scientifically valid cure for most types of tinnitus. There is, however, remedies that focus on diverting attention, addressing the emotional impact, and or cognitive therapy.

Western Herbalism: Tinnitus can serve as an important marker pointing to other potential health issues, since it a symptom and not a disease. Whatever the cause it tends to worsen in times of tension, stress and or muscle spasms. Stimulates like caffeine or nicotine, which increases vasoconstriction, can exasperate it. Furthermore, it can be caused by damaged fine hair cells of the inner ear. Although this cannot be reversed there might we some reduction felt in using some of the suggestions below. Stress reduction can often be helpful. Some herbs have been used to address tinnitus including black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and more recently ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba).

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM): In TCM we know that the images6kidney qi communicates with the ears and that as we age or because of various states of health this can affect our qi, therefore the kidneys are often identified as root causes of tinnitus.

In approaching treatment of tinnitus, it is important to distinguish between an acute or sudden occurrence or a long-term tinnitus that gets worse over time or comes and goes. Furthermore, it is important to determine whether it is an excess-type or a deficiency-type of tinnitus. A key to this determination is that an excess type of tinnitus is often experienced in only one ear, while a deficiency based tinnitus tends to develop in both ears. The deficiency type usually gets better during the day and gets worse at night. A combination of deficiency and excess syndromes is possible, especially in persons with other illnesses or with tinnitus that has persisted for several years.

The following is a description of excess and deficiency patterns that might be able to better pinpoint treatment principles to be used.

Excess type #1, Hyperactive liver and gallbladder fire:

  • Sudden onset
  • Continual sound
  • Excess symptoms (a headache, flushed face, irritability)
  • Excessive anger, fright
  • Excessive use of alcohol

TCM formula: Long dan Xie Gan Tang (Gentiana Comb) with the addition of moutan, ligustrum, for persistent liver fire weakening the Kidney water.

Excess type #2, Phlegm Fire Syndrome

  • Intermittent ringing in the ears
  • Feeling of blocked ears
  • Chest stuffiness
  • Excess phlegm
  • Dizziness
  • Blockage manifesting as difficult urination or constipation

TCM formula: Wen Dan Tang (Bamboo and Hoelen Comb)

  • with the addition of pear, haliotis, uncaria (liver)
  • with lapis, scute, rhubarb and aquilaria (blockage of chest, constipation)
  • with dampness (Ban Zia Bai Zhu Tian Ma Tang)

Diet: avoid fat or spicy food

Deficiency type #1, Deficient Kidney Jing

  • Gradual worsening ringing
  • Dizziness
  • Backache
  • Deficient heat symptoms

TCM formula: Liu Wei Di Huang Wan (Rehmannia Six Formula) and schizandra.

TCM formula Er Long Zuo Ci Wan (Tinnitus Left Supporting Pills)

Deficiency type #2, Sinking Spleen Qi (yang def.)

  • Intermittently occurring tinnitus that is relieved through rest and reduced stress
  • Low energy
  • Poor appetite
  • Loose stools

TCM formula: Yi Qi Chong Ming Tang (Ginseng, Astragalus and Pueraria Comb.)

Lifestyle: stress reduction, adequate kidney and spleen building dietimages5

Ear Massage: There are several sites that have detailed directions for addressing tinnitus through massage:

The bottom line is that the early intervention is necessary for long-term success. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms outlined in any of the treatment options, seek the advice of a Physician or Clinical Herbalist (http://www.americanherbalistsguild.com/herbalists-and-chapters-near-you)

Sources:

Davis, Kathleen FNP. 2016. Tinnitus: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment. The University of Illinois-Chicago, School of Medicine. Available from

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/156286.php

Flaws, B Sionneau P. 2001. The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Disease with Chinese Medicine. Blue Poppy Press. p. 55-56.

Hoffmann, D. 2003. Medical Herbalism. Healing Arts Press. P372-373.

Dharmananda, S. Ph. D. 1998. Treatment of Tinnitus, Vertigo, and Meniere’s disease with Chinese herbs. Institute for Traditional Medicine. Available from http://www.itmonline.org/arts/tinmen.htm

 

 

Pao Zhi- Ancient Techniques applied to Western Herbs

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Honey Stir Fried Licorice Root

Pao Zhi is an ancient Chinese technique of altering the tastes, energies and directions of medicinal substances by processing. This transformational alchemical approach to preparation can increase herbs therapeutic effectiveness and applicability for individualized treatment. Albeit a simplistic view, I view it is akin to cooking, in which the very nature of food, is transformed for assimilation.

What about western herbs? I have used some of the very same processes described below with Western traditional herbs including honey stir-fried elecampane root to direct its energy to digestion, dry stir fried solomon seal with a salt solution to direct its energy towards the kidneys, cooking nettles with black bean juice to enhance its ability to nourish blood, and dry stir frying rice with angelica to reinforce it action on the spleen.

An individual herb can be used in different ways depending on what part of the plant is used; where as, with the process of pao zhi one can transform the energy, flavor and action of the same part of the plant. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) the preparation of herbs is an integral aspect of the therapeutic strategy. Pao Zhi is a vast subject and this article is only the tip of the iceberg. I have included some references at the end of the article for further exploration.

There are a multitude of reasons why herbs are subjected to processing including the removal of debris, reduction of toxicity, reduction of odors and flavors, to reinforce or modify energetic properties, prolong storage and most importantly, to increase assimilation. This image represents a visual overview of Pao Zhi techniques and the types of products that are produced. The following is a partial list of methods of Pao Zhi preparation and pinyin names, which are reflected in the naming of Chinese Herbs:

  • Sheng: uncooked without heat or cooking.
  • Shu: prepared with heat or cooking
  • Shui Zhi (w/ water): multiple rinsing and washing, moistening and soaking
  • Shui Fei, using water in the process of pulverizing. Used to eliminate salts, toxicity, refine minerals, and soften for cutting.
  • Huo Zhi (w/ fire): Stir-frying, calcination, roasting, baking and blast frying. Stir-frying might be done with or without the addition of various substances including honey, vinegar, rise, wheat brand, etc. that alter the energetic action of the herb.
  • Sometimes a combination all or any of the above including steaming, boiling, distilling and dipped into water after calcinated.
  • Fermentation and sprouting or germination is also used as a method of transforming herbs.
  • Many of the herbs that are toxic such as Fu Zi (aconitum carmichaeli) or Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae ternatae) involve successive transformational processes to make them safe for use.  This is a video that shows the traditional preparation of Fu Zi.

One of the most common methods of transformation is through the use of stir-frying with either one or several substances to change the energy/action of the herb. The following examples illustrates how Pao Zhi can effect flavor, actions and corresponding organs:

  • Stir-frying with rice, with its sweet flavor and neutral energy helps to eliminate dampness andSlide10 supplements the spleen and qi. Directions: a pan is preheated and rice is added and stir-fried until it starts to smell, the herbs are added, and cooked until both are brown, then the herbs are separated out. An example of this is with Dang Shen (Codonopsis).
  • Honey has a sweet flavor and cool energy but when heated it becomes warming. Directions: combine a small amount of honey and dilute with water until fairly runny. This is tossed with the herbs until they are coated. The herbs are stir-fried in a dry pan over low heat until the honey is no longer sticky. This process alters the herbs actions to reinforce the supplementation of the spleen and qi by increasing their moistening and tonification properties. Examples: Dang Shen (codonopsis), Gan Cao (licorice) and Huang Qi (astragalus).
  • Salt has a cold energy and enhances downward action directing the energetic actions of theSlide09 herbs to the kidneys, supplements yin, addresses empty fire blazing, promotes softening of nodules and stimulates diuretic action. Directions: Mix salt and water for a 2% solution or 2 grams of salt in 100 millilitres of solution. Toss the herbs with the salt solution until well coated and then stir-fried over low heat until dry. An example of this process is with Zhi Mu (Anemarrhenae) and Huang Bai (Phellodendrum), for use in yin deficiency with empty fire blazing.
  • Vinegar (rice) has a warm energy. It also has a sour and bitter flavor directing its action towards the liver. Directions: take 15 parts vinegar to 100 parts water then soak the herb thoroughly, followed up by stir-frying it over a low fire until a golden color.   Examples are Chai Hu (Bupleurum) and Qing Pi (citrus peel).
  • Wine is acidic and sweet flavored. It is also heating and helps to increase circulation or quickening of the blood in the network vessels. Directions: using 20-50 parts of wine to 100 parts of herb, the herb is tossed with the wine, and then stir-fried over low heat until yellow. Examples are Dang Gui (angelica sinensis) and Chuan Xiong (ligusticum wallachii)

An excellent example of this is to look at the different methods for preparing Di Huang (Rehmannia glutinosa, Chinese foxglove) to obtain different energies, tastes and actions.

  • Xian Di Huang, (raw fresh root) is sweet and bitter with a cold energy. It clears heat, cools the blood engenders fluids and stops thirst.
  • Di Huang Zhi, (raw fresh juice) is sweet and slightly bitter with a cold energy. It clears heat and stops bleeding.
  • Sheng Di Huang, (dry uncooked) is sweet and slightly bitter with a cool energy. It enriches yin and clears heat.
  • Chao Shen Di Huang, (dry stir-fried till scorched) is sweet and slightly bitter. It has a cool to neutral energy.   It enriches yin and nourishes the blood.
  • Sheng Di Huang Tan, (dry stir-fried till carbonized) is sweet, bitter and slightly astringent. It has a cool to neutral energy.
  • Shu Di Huang**(steaming in rice wine). It is sweet and slightly warming. It supplements yin, supplements the blood, supplements the essence, and supplements the kidneys.
  • Chao Shu Di Huang, (steaming in rice wine and stir-fried till scorched). It is sweet flavored and warm energy. It nourishes the blood, nourishes the constructive qi, and enriches yin.
  • Shu Di Huang Tan, (steaming in rice wind and stir-fried till carbonized). It is sweet flavored and slightly astringent. It is warm energetically. It supplements the blood and stops bleeding.
  • ** David Wolf and Mountain Rose Herbs prepared rehmannia is manufactured, by boiling the root in a mixture of yellow wine and black bean infusion until the liquids have been boiled away and the roots are black. The roots are then dried in the sun.

Slide15You can see that by using different processes one can change the energy of the herb from cold to warm and the flavor from sweet to astringent. By understanding the needs of the individual client, one can further amend prepared Shu Di Huang by using ginger juice (dampness), cardamom (or chen pi (citrus peel) for spleen vacuity and qi stagnation when stir frying.

The following link is a study on the chemical comparisons of dried rehmannia root and prepared rehmannia root (steamed). The report’s results show characteristic changes in the content of major monosaccharides and oligosaccharides as the dried root is converted in the steaming process of the prepared root, indicating a possible special role for fructose, stachyose and rehmaionoside in the differing therapeutic effects of dried and prepared rehmannia. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211383512001499

Further Reference:

  • Sionneau, Philippe. An Introduction to the use of Processed Chinese Medicinals. Blue Poppy Press, 1995.

Calamus-Smart Soup, Brain Protectant and Traditional Uses

Calamus, Sweet Flag, Acorns calamus, Vacha, Shi Chang Pu, rhizoma acori tatarinowii(石菖蒲)

Recent research from the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of c4f6301f8e8504f05b68c1b5d558dacdBiochemistry and Cell Biology in Shanghai found a traditional Chinese medicine known as smart soup (聰明湯) could help in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, of which calamus was one of the ingredients.  The soup, which is a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula used for many centuries and is still prescribed by Chinese medical physicians to patients with aging-related cognitive impairment.  Smart Soup is officially documented in Gu Jin Yi Jian, a book published in 1576.  It is composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (calamus), Poria cum Radix Pini and Radix Polygalae.  Calamus has been shown to exhibit a neuroprotective action and attenuate learning and memory deficits.  According to the research the scientists found the smart soup, or more specifically radix polygalae, could significantly reduce the generation of amyloid beta, with the levels in treated mice more than 18 per cent lower than in those untreated.  They found that the other two herbs – rhizoma acori tatarinowii (calamus) and poria cum radix pini – appeared to protect the neurons against the damaging effect of ama.

index1According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) calamus is aromatic, acrid, bitter and warm. It belongs to the category of aromatic substances that open the orifices and enters the Heart and Stomach channels. It strengthens the Spleen and Stomach, opens the sensory orifices, dislodge phlegm, transforms dampness, calms the spirit, enhances digestion, and promotes blood flow and movement of Qi. It is often used in the treatment of dizziness, dulled senses, stupor and coma.  It has been combined in many other formulas including:

1) Di Tan Tang from Ji Sheng Fang (Life-saving prescriptions). It is combined with Ban Xia (Pinellia), Tian Nan Xing (Arisaema), Ju Hong (Exocarpium Citri Erythrocarpae), etc. to treat stoke due to phlegm confusing heart, unconsciousness, and a hardened or stiff body of the tongue impeding speech.

2) Chang Pu Yu Jin Tang from Wen Bing Quan Shu (Complete Compendium of Warm Disease). It is formulated with Yu Jin (Tumeric Tuber), Pinellia, Zhu Li (Succus Bambusae), etc. to cure blocking of phlegm-heat, high fever, coma, and delirium.

3) Qing Xin Wen Dan Tang from Gu Jin Yi Jian (Mirror of Ancient and Contemporary Medicine). It is coupled with Zhi Shi (Citrus Aurantium), Zhu Ru (Bamboo Shavings), Huang Lian (Coptis Root), etc. to heal epileptic seizures caused by phlegm-heat.

4) Ru Lian Po Yin from Huo Huan Lun (Treatise on Cholera). It is matched with Coptis, Hou Po (Magnolia Bark), etc. to treat dampness forming with heat, retention of damp-heat, vomiting and diarrhea accompanied with fever, chest and epigastric fullness and distress, and yellowish glossy coating of the tongue.

5) Kai Jin San from Yi Xue Xin Wu (Medical Revelations). It works with Coptis, Fu Ling (Poria), Shi Lian Zi (Sinocrassula indica seed), etc. to cure no desire to eat and rectal tenesmus after dysentery due to the accumulation of damp turbidity and heat toxic in colon.

6) Bu Wang San from Zheng Zhi Zhun Sheng (The Level-line of Patterns and Treatment) and Kai Xin San from Qian Jin Fang (Thousand golden essential prescriptions). Both of them are equipped with Ren Shen (Ginseng), Poria, Chang Pu (Acorus calamus), etc. to heal forgetfulness.

The article on smart soup peaked my interest, in that I knew that calamus also played an extensive role in Ayurveda herbal traditions, as well as, in Native American use.

Calamus, is a tall perennial, wetland monocot in the Acoraceae family.  It index4is a strongly aromatic, semi-aquatic perennial herb with a ginger-like stem which spreads into the ground. Originating in Asia it was widely exported across the globe.  The leaves and rhizomes have been used medicinally and as a substitute for ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg.  The aroma of calamus essential oil is valued in the perfume industry while its, crystallized form, is called “German ginger”.

index6In Native American traditions calamus has been extensively used for a variety of conditions and is considered by some tribes as a panacea herb or cure-all.  Used by Canadian, northern and mid western tribes, its use ranged from treatment of digestive issues to blood medicine and everything in between.  The Cherokee, from which I descend, used it for headaches, diarrhea, gas, colic, colds, kidney disease, worms and urinary infections.  It was ground up and mixed with tobacco and smoked for headaches by the Blackfoot. An infusion of the roots along with chokecherry was taken for coughs by the Algonquin tribe from Quebec.  Not only used internally calamus was used in charms for keeping spirits away, to protect warriors, keep children safe and as hunting medicine by the many of these tribes.  The most common use of calamus throughout all tribes was as a carminative, tooth aches, cold remedies, and sore throats.  In a review of ethnographic records, it had limited use as a herb for improving clarity of thought , although the Rappahannock specifically used the fresh juice as a tonic for older people and several other tribes considered it a beneficial tonic.

In western pharmacology it is classified as a stimulant, emetic, nauseant, stomachic, aromatic, expectorant, carminative, antispasmodic and nervine sedative, antioxidant and antimicrobial.

acorus%20calamus%20(2)In Ayurveda calamus is known as Vacha.  It has been used in nervous system issues and for mental and emotional disorders.  It has been used to quite the mind especially in the case of disorders characterized by an impairment of concentration such as ADD and ADHD.  As in other herbal traditions it is used in digestive disturbances.  Todd Caldecott, an esteemed herbalist specializing in Ayurveda, wrote an extensive monograph about its use.  In Ayurvedic tradition, Vacha is a ‘sattvic’ herb in its action as a stimulating nerve tonic that helps support brain functioning. It is also used as a rejuvenate for the brain and nervous system, it is used to promote cerebral circulation and to help support overall brain health and functioning. It has long been used to counter the effects of drug use, as in the case of heavy marijuana use, from fatty tissues within the liver, nervous system and brain. It is often used in post-Stroke (CVA) recovery protocols in the treatment of aphasia.

There has been some concerns regarding its safety. Calamus and products derived from it (such as its oil) were banned in 1968 as food additives and medicines by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Per the FDA’s website “Food containing any added calamus, oil of calamus, or extract of calamus is deemed to be adulterated in violation of the act based upon an order published in the Federal Register of May 9, 1968 (33 FR 6967)”. 

Jim McDonald a highly respected herbalist wrote extensively on calamus and is excellent reading.  According to information from his website and through info gleaned various other internet searches the ban was the result of a laboratory study that involved supplementing the diets of rodents over a prolonged period of time with massive doses of isolated chemicals (?-asarone).  The subject animals developed malignant tumors, and the plant was thereafter labeled procarcinogenic, although it  is not clear whether the observed carcinogenic effect in rats was relevant to the human organism, particularly given the large dosages and protracted duration of the regimen. Most authorities advise against ingesting the Indian Jammu strain. (Four varieties of Acorus calamus strains exist in nature; diploid, triploid, tetraploid and hexaploid. Acorus calamus americanus is widely used and believed completely safe in appropriate therapeutic dosages). No health hazards or side effects are known in conjunction with the proper administration of designated therapeutic dosages of Calamus of European or American origin (triploid strain, up to 15% beta- asarone in volatile oil)  but long-term use of this herb should be avoided and use should be intermittent.

Other sites with extensive information on calamus:

http://www.herbcraft.org/calamus.htmlhttp://toddcaldecott.com/herbs/vacha/

http://www.mariatrebenherbs.com/?pid=55&sid=57:CALAMUS-SWEET-FLAG

use as essential oil-http://oilhealthbenefits.com/calamus-essential-oil/

Information on Smart Soup Research

ww.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0111215

Seeds available through Horizon Herbs

https://www.horizonherbs.com/product.asp?specific=384

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Herbal Remedies for Cold and Flu Season

coldsEvery fall I teach a class at the local community college on herbal remedies for cold and flu season.  I teach from a primarily Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) point of view, that contends that we are surrounded by pathogens and the way to prevent “catching” them is to ensure a healthy immune system.  In other words, prevention is the first order of defense.  I would suggest you read my blog post at Changing of the Seasons. to get a better idea of some ways you can increase your immunity.

To get started there are several Westerns categories of herbs that are particularly useful for addressing cold and flu symptoms including:

  • Alterative-Alters or improves functioning
  • Antibacterial
  • Antiviral
  • Antibiotic
  • Antipyretic-lowers fever
  • Diaphoretic-induces sweating
  • Expectorant-expels mucus

The good news is that there are numerous herbs that are helpful for colds and flu, although in this article we are only going to cover a few,  I would encourage you to continue to read and learn.  Many herbs have several properties and in Western Herbalism they would use them according to what symptoms are being presented. Many herbs cover several categories, so it is important to know their individual actions.comparison It is helpful to know all of the properties of herbs, for example Goldenseal, which is antibacterial is also very astringent, drying up mucous, yet with colds mucous is a natural and necessary body defense, mucus should not be stopped, it is better to thin the mucus, using expectorants rather than a drying antibacterial.

Wearing a scarf can help reduce exposure to cold

Wearing a scarf can help reduce exposure to cold

Prevention:  Hand washing, hand washing, hand washing, enough said.  There are several tactics that I recommend for increasing immunity as we go into the fall season.  Although not a herb, adequate supplies of Vitamin D, which contain calcitriol are a must. Recent research indicates that calcitriol enhances innate immunity by prompting cells to produce a large numbers of antimicrobial peptides that are like broad spectrum antibiotics. Fatty fish is the only natural source of vitamin D. A 3.5 oz serving of cooked salmon, for example, has 360 IU; 3 oz. of canned tuna has 200; and 13.4 oz. of canned sardines has 250.  Most experts now believe 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day from all sources—sun, diet, supplements—may be what we need for optimum health.  Look for supplements that contain vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), which is three to four times more potent than vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol).

Mushrooms are another go-to in terms of building immunity.  In Japan and China, medicinal mushrooms, such as shiitake, maitake and reishi, have long been regarded as longevity tonics. Research indicates that all these fungi are powerful allies for strengthening the immune system.  Shitake and maitake can both be incorporated into our meal preparation, reishi needs to be taken as a supplement.  Here is a web site that has much more detailed information on using reishi medicinally.

Last but not least Astragalus, (Astragalus membranaceus) is considered an adaptogen, providing deep immune-system support.  There have been many clinical studies showing how astragalus not only boosts the immune system, but also encourages an increase in immune cell (T-cells, natural killer cells, macrophages, immunoglobulin) activity, production, and function.  Both astragalus and mushrooms contain polysaccharides, which have been found to improve immune function by increasing the activity of macrophages, which have a voracious appetite for harmful microorganisms and cancerous cells. Since astragalus is a mild tonic herb, 1 oz a day is the suggested dosage, for chronic

Taking action: We can take several steps to try to mitigate or reduce the symptoms of colds and flu by tuning into our bodies.  At the first sign of an imbalance, sneezing, runny nose, or sore throat, take immediate action.  One of the remedies that I swear by, is Fire Cider Vinegar.  In fact I just received a call a local actress, who had used my Cold and Flu Kicker (fire cider vinegar) and was desperate to get some more before her play started.

Fire Cider Vinegarfire cider

Fill a mason jar with:

  • 1 part minced garlic
  • 1 part grated horseradish (let it sit for three minutes in a bowl before adding it to the mix.)
  • 1/2 part grated ginger (no need to peel)
  • 2 parts minced onion
  • 2 rhizomes of grated turmeric (optional)
  • ¼ -1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

Cover with organic apple cider vinegar and let sit for 4-6 weeks. Strain off. At this point you can add ¼ -1/2 cup of honey and take by the tablespoon full as a daily tonic or when you feel a cold coming on, although I usually just add some to water and drink straight. Warning it can be quite potent.

Scallions:  The record shows that the Chinese started use scallions in the late Han dynasty (25-220AD). This remedy is for the very early stages of wind cold.  It induces sweating by warming and unblocking the yang and can treat both abdominal pain and distention or nasal congestion when the blockage is from “cold”.

Cinnamon and Scallion Cure: Finely chop the white part of one scallion. Put it into a teacup and add two slices of raw ginger and a dash of powdered cinnamon. Fill the cup with hot water, let the herbs steep for 10 minutes, then drink. The cinnamon and ginger induce sweating, and the scallion clears the sinus.

garlicGarlic:  Cultures around the world have embraced garlic as a cure for everything from colds to cancer. Prior to the discovery of penicillin, garlic was the treatment of choice for infections, such as pneumonia, bronchitis, tuberculosis and dysentery.    It is believe that the sulfur compounds that imbue garlic with its characteristic odor and flavor that are responsible for the herb’s health benefits. Most of the research has focused on the sulfur compound allicin, which has antimicrobial properties. Allicin is created when alliin, a sulfur-containing amino acid in garlic, comes into contact with another garlic compound, the enzyme allinase. This enzymatic reaction takes place when garlic is chopped, crushed or chewed, but it is destroyed during cooking.  Eating raw garlic, or better yet, combining it with olive oil and spreading it on bread is a great way to get lots of garlic into your system.  Suggested dose is 3-5 cloves a day, at the first sign of symptoms.

Echinacea (ssp): Echinacea has been used for as a natural antibiotic in that it activates leukocytes and T-cell formation to assist your body ability to fight off infections.  Echinacea is considered an alterative, a class of herbs that alters your body ability to function.  The trick with using Echinacea is to take it every two hours, due to our livers filtering system.  Furthermore according to several leading herbalists, it becomes ineffective after 10 days.  Again it is one of those herbs that one should use immediately when one starts to experience symptoms.

Elderberries (Sambucus nigra): All parts of the elder tree are medicinal but for this elderberriesblog we are going to concentrate on the berries and flowers.  The berries are not only delicious but they are antiviral and effective for dispelling colds. In research conducted in Israel, Hasassah’s Oncology Lab, determined that elderberry stimulates the body’s immune system and they are using it therapeutically. My preferred method of preparation is making a decoction of elderberries and then preserving it with 30% alcohol.  For every cup of water I add one oz of elderberries, simmering this covered for 1 to 2 hours (crook pots work well).  Straining the mixture, I measure and add 30% alcohol which acts as a preservative.  There are

Is it a Cold or the Flu:  Although a seemingly simple question it can make a big difference in an herbal treatment protocol.  This is a simple chart that help to distinguish whether you are dealing with a cold or flu.

Cold or Flu Chart

Cold or Flu Chart

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) a cold is considered wind cold and the flu is considered wind heat.  Wind is considered one of several pernicious influences in TCM.  Why this is important is that the herbs that are used to address a cold or the flu are based on the energy or nature of the illness.  A simple way of looking at this is that stimulating or heating herbs are used to address wind cold and cooling or cold energy herbs are used to address wind heat.  Furthermore if we know the constitution of the person experiencing the illness, we can then include herbs to strengthen the person’s response.

A Wind-Cold pattern may include a slight fever with more chills than fever, aversion to wind coldcold, sudden onset and the throat is itchy and slightly sore. Herbal strategies for this type of sickness include releasing the exterior with stimulating diaphoretic herbs. Some Examples of stimulating diaphoretic herbs scallions, cinnamon, cayenne and ginger, or Fire Cider.

Cold be Gone Tea: 1 Tablespoon cinnamon cassia stick, broken up and  simmered in 1 pint of water for 20 minutes.  After I remove from heat, I add  1 Tablespoon of grated ginger and 1/8 tsp of cayenne.  I then sweeten with honey and sip throughout the day.

wind heatA Wind-Heat pattern may include a high fever with slight chills, sweating, aversion to heat, yellow secretions (through coughing, nasal discharge or even a yellow coating on the tongue) and a swollen sore throat. Herbal strategies for this type of sickness includes releasing the exterior through relaxing diaphoretics and using bitter, cooling herbs.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium):  Yarrow is one of my favorite herbs in that it grows all around my house and has enough uses that it deserves its own chapter, but in this case it can be very specific for fever.  It works as a diaphoretic by opening up the pores and letting trapped internal heat escape.   It causes sweating relieving the first signs of flu, fevers, chicken pox and measles (it helps eruptions come out faster). and is extremely effective for breaking a fever.

  • Create an infusion by covering one ounce of dried yarrow with a quart of boiling water. After 4 hours, strain the infusion. For small children, add the infusion to a tepid bath (ask your doctor first.) For older children and adults, the infusion may be sipped as tea.
  • Alternatively, yarrow tea may be made by steeping 1-2 teaspoons of the dried herb in one cup boiling water. Drink three times daily. In capsule form, 2-4 grams may be taken three times daily.

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum): is in the aster family. Boneset is a fabulous herb for fevers, colds and flu. It does not taste good, but it does the job, although it needs to be taken when warm to be effective. It was considered a miracle herb in the 1918 epidemic influenza. It should only be used for a short time, for acute conditions. Infusion of 1 T in cup of water, or 10-40 drops of tincture.

Fever Reducing Teatea

2 parts catnip

2 parts yarrow

1 part peppermint

1 part echinacea root

In parting, a Traditional Chinese Patent formula that I always include when talking about Wind Heat is Yin Chiao. Yin Chiao is known to remove excess heat in the blood which, in yin chaotraditional Chinese medicine could become a health hazard for many body systems. It also helps remove harmful toxins in the body through expelling heat.

The most interesting thing about this formula is the comparison between it and the best-selling cold and flu medicine “Airborne”.  Planetary Herbs Yin Chiao contains Forsythia Fruit, Japanese Honeysuckle Flower, Platycodon Root, Chinese Mint Aerial Parts, airboneLophatherum Leaf, Chinese Licorice Root and Rhizome, Schizonepeta Whole Plant Parts, Prepared Soy Bean, Burdock Fruit and Phragmites Rhizome. Notice the small print on the label of “Airborne”, many of the herbs are the same, begging the question of whether “Airborne”  is effective due to its vitamin content or the Chinese Traditional herbs that are specific to reducing fever and having antiviral properties.

 

 

 

 

Blood Nourishing Tonic- East meets West

IMG_3114

Anemia and Blood Nourishing Tonic

Blood is a vital substance according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In fact in The Book of Leviticus it states, “the life of a creature is in the blood”. In Western medicine, blood is defined as a bodily fluid that delivers necessary substances, such as nutrients and oxygen, to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word “blood” dates to the oldest English, circa 1000 AD. The word is derived from Middle English, which is derived from the Old English word blôd. Throughout history and cultures, blood has held both medical and mystical importance. In the Greek and Roman Humoural system, blood was associated with air, springtime and a sanguine personality. They believed it to be produced by the liver. Blood became the basis for one of the oldest medical techniques “bloodletting”. In fact an interesting fact was the bloodletting or “bleeding” a patient to health was modeled on the process of menstruation. Hippocrates believed that menstruation functioned to “purge women of bad humors”.

Qi-300x300As we turn towards the East in TCM, blood has a different meaning. In TCM, blood is itself a form of Qi. Although difficult to translate the word “Qi”, I think of it as a all encompassing life force or energy. In fact, in TCM they consider blood inseparable from Qi itself. It is believed that blood is nourished from the distillation of the nutrients that we take into our body (food Qi). Given this outlook, one can start to see the interrelationship between the importance of eating well and the health of your blood. For instance, think of cholesterol, and the relationship between food and the buildup of plaque in our blood. Although this blog post isn’t about our digestion, you can see now important a well running digestive system is to blood health.

Deficient blood is often an underlying and missed issue in many conditions, especially those related to inflammation and circulation. In TCM “blood deficiency” include low blood pressure, various forms of ischemia, cold fingers and toes (including Raynaud’s syndrome,images both primary and secondary), and fatigue (high blood pressure for other reasons may also be present). Other slightly less common symptoms include thinning hair, heart palpitations, dizziness upon standing (postural hypotension) or vertigo (especially if there is hypoglycemia), falling asleep of arms, restless legs, frequent infections, menstrual cramps, headaches of various sorts, slow healing, low sex drive, sinus issues, ringing in the ears, nails that break easily or grow slowly, and low blood sugar. Fertility can also be affected, as the uterus requires adequate blood. Pregnancy is another time that requires an adequate supply of healthy blood. Our joints, ligaments and connective tissue are also sensitive to blood deficiency, since they get the least amount of blood. Sometimes blood deficiency does not present as full-blown anemia, but is still an underlying condition. There are some medical issues that blood deficiency is either directly related or an outcome of another condition.

Since food is considered our first medicine, I will outline some foods that help to nourish your our blood and then talk about one herbal remedy that is also useful. To nourish blood one has to increase the digestive absorption of the food that is eaten and add specific food to generate healthy blood. I will cover increasing absorption of nutrients in another blog post. indexThe nutrients most need to build blood are iron, folic acid and B12. Adequate protein is also crucial. In order to absorb iron we need to have adequate levels of copper, B and C vitamins. Greens, greens and more greens, as long as it isn’t mostly spinach are a great source of iron, along with legumes, grains, nuts and seeds. Algae and seaweeds are also excellent sources, although use sparely, since they are a super food or super concentrated. The Japanese made a blood builder out of pounded sweet rice and mugwort, or for a Western version you can use nettles. When blood deficiency is severe, protein from animal sources might be chosen. Dark grapes, blackberries, huckleberries, raspberries are also great. Actually one of the best sources of iron is organic animal liver, but honestly most people can’t get it down, and prefer it as a desiccated pill. When one builds blood naturally there is less inclination for constipation, a consequence of taking it in tablet form.

IMG_3111

Rumex crispus (yellow dock)

I have been experimenting with making a self-stable blood nourishing syrup. My primary target is pregnant woman, so using herbs that are designated, as safe during pregnancy is vital. There are many Chinese herbs that are great blood nourishers, including dang gui (angelica sinensis), rehmannia root, and peony root, not all safe during pregnancy. Since I am all about a bioregionalism approach I have primarily relied upon what grows in my garden. The base of my syrup is blackstrap molasses, an iron rich food source. I grow medicinal herbs so used yellow dock root (Rumex crispus) as my main ingredient. Although a pain to dig up and process, I find it is more medicinally active than in the dried form. I also included rose hips to potentize its effectiveness with Vit. C.  I also added orange peel for its carminative properties and cinnamon for its ability to enhance circulation. This recipe makes 2 quarts, so divide it depending on how much you want to make. When making syrups, I tend to cook them over several days to extract as much medicinal goodness as possible.

IMG_3116

After 3 days of cooking

 Anemia and Blood Nourishing Tonic*

1/2 cup of rose hips

1-cup dandelion root

1-cup of alfalfa leaf

3-cups yellow dock root

1-cup nettle leaf

1 cup raspberry leaf

2 T. kelp powder

1-Tablespoon of orange peel

1 cinnamon stick

2- qts of blackstrap molasses

Combine the blackstrap molasses and herbs in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce, heat and simmer on low for one hour, let sit overnight, repeat for 3 days. Or you can use a crock-pot set to the lowest setting. Strain and bottle
For adults who are blood deficient, 1 tablespoon 3 t.i.d is recommended, if using as a tonic, 1 Tablespoon a day is adequate.
For children, 1-3 teaspoons daily is sufficient.

*Recipe is based on dried herbs.

 

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