Arrowleaf Balsam

IMG_2853

Arrowleaf Balsam (Balsamorhiza sagittata)

I have written about Arrowleaf Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) before, and it is by far my current favorite plant in Central Oregon.  I just harvested new root this spring for my cough syrups.  It grows all over Central Oregon, but finding a patch that is legally harvested is often the toughest part.  If you are harvesting on forest service land, just make sure that you get a plant permit from the forest that you are harvesting on, to avoid costly fines.

Arrowleaf Balsam, is part of the Aster Family, Asteraceae, a species of the Balsamroot genus, and is a perennial herbaceous plant. Harvesting the plant can be tricky in that it often grows in rocky soil and using a cupn, or digging stick is advised. Take as much of the root as you can in that it took a long time for that root to get that big, so wasting it would not honor the plant.  A search for ethnobotanical applications turned up 109 uses (http://herb.umd.umich.edu/herb/search.pl?searchstring=Balsamorhiza+sagittata). This should not be surprising, as plant names often reveal the plant’s characteristics, in this case, the root as supplying balsam: “Balsam is a term used for various pleasantly scented plant products. These are oily or gummy oleoresins, usually containing benzoic acid or cinnamic acid, obtained from the exudate of various trees and shrubs and used as a base for some botanical medicines.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balsam).

  • This is a summary of uses from the University of Michigan ethnobotany database; its properties classify it as an analgesic, disinfectant, antirheumatic (internal), dermatological aid, venereal aid, gynecological aid, urinary aid, diaphoretic, eye medicine, antidiarrheal, oral/throat aid, burn dressing, cathartic, pulmonary aid, hemostat, tuberculosis remedy, dietary aid, cold remedy, febrifuge (lowers fevers), gastrointestinal aid, panacea, sedative, beverage, candy, food, incense/fragrance, tool/containers, and gathered for trade. If you follow the blog to the bottom it shows pictures on processing the root.

Here is a partial listing of traditional uses of Arrowleaf.

  • -Root smudge smoke inhaled for body aches.
  • -Poultice of chewed roots applied to blisters and sores.
  • -Infusion of leaves, roots and stems taken for stomach pains and headaches.
  • -Steam of decoction of plant inhaled for headache and used as wash on head.
  • -Decoction or infusion of leaves, roots and stems taken for stomach pains/stomachache.
  • -Infusion of leaves, stems and roots taken for colds.
  • -Decoction of root taken when labor begins, to insure easy delivery.
  • -Root chewed for toothaches.
  • Infusion of roots taken for whooping cough, tuberculosis, or to increase urine
  • Poultice of root infusion used for wounds, cuts and bruises.
  • -Decoction of root taken to produce profuse perspiration for rheumatism.
  • -Poultice of mashed root applied to insect bites or swellings.
  • -Poultice of powdered, dried root applied to syphilitic sores.
  • -Pulverized root sprinkled on sores and boils.
  • Infusion of root rubbed into hair and scalp to help hair grow.
  • Infusion of leaves used as a wash for poison ivy and running sores.
  • Seeds eaten for dysentery.
  • Young shoots eaten raw or baked in the ground or oven.
  • Young stems and leaves eaten raw as a salad.
  • Roots eaten raw and cooked.

Below is a series of pictures that depict how to process it for cough syrup:

IMG_2377

After harvesting rinse dirt with water and clean roots with brush.

IMG_2380

Then smash with hammer, or meat tenderizer to expose roots removing outer layer and tearing into strips.

IMG_2384

Tear the root into strips and put into large cast iron dutch over.  Add honey and simmer on low heat for 4 hours, let cool overnight, and simmer again for 2 hours, let cool overnight, strain.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: