Crack Leather: Fermented Fruit and Herb Leather

img_1635What do you get when you mix together a sprouted cracker recipe with a fruit leather recipe.  You get crack leather. Recently I was playing around with making fruit leather, based on another blog which I had written a while back, https://herbalgoddessmedicinals.wordpress.com/2015/04/18/making-medicinal-herbal-fruit-leather/.

I teach a class on cooking with medicinal herbs and am always trying to push the envelope with different creations.  In the class, we explore how one can incorporate medicinal herbs into cooking.  The use of tonic herbs (gentle food like herbs) into everyday cooking is prevalent in food from China and India.  One of the easiest techniques  is to combine astragalus in cooking broths and soups.

Now to get back to crack leather. For this experiment, I decided to incorporate sprouted seeds and nuts into the fruit leather along with some powdered medicinal herbs.  Sprouting of seeds and nuts replicates germination, which activates and multiplies nutrients (particularly Vitamins A, B, and C), neutralizes enzyme inhibitor’s, and promotes the growth of vital digestive enzymes. Taking it a step further,  I also opted to ferment the leather before I dried it.  After checking in my with local fermentation expert, Kristy Shapla the author of the Brew Your Medicine, on whether fermentation would destroy the healthy probiotic fermentation, she assured me that if I kept the temps below 110 degrees it would be fine.  I am a firm believer that the fermentation of herbs assists with the bioavailability of their chemical constituents, not to mention the added benefit of incorporating fermented food into your daily diet. The fermenting of herbs is increasingly finding its way into supplements and has been shown to increase the herbs bioavailability,

I am a firm believer that the fermentation of herbs assists with the bioavailability of their chemical constituents, not to mention the importance of incorporating fermented food into your daily diet. The fermenting of herbs is increasingly finding its way into supplements and has been shown to increase the herbs bioavailability, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ptr.2758/abstract

The results were delicious.  This recipe is fairly loose and is open to lots of substitutes including the addition of other herbal powders, nuts, and dried fruits.  The secret is to make sure the mixture is not too liquid or too thick, rather the consistency of thick pancake batter.

Equipment:

  • Food dehydrator or lowest temperature in the oven
  • Fruit leather latex sheets or cookie sheet
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Wooden spoon

Ingredients:

  • 2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/3 cup tbsp chia seeds, sprouted
  • 1 to 1-1/2 cup herbal tea (I used nettle, ginger and rose hips)
  • 1 Tablespoon maca and Shatavari (you can use any combination of herbal powders)
  • 1/3 cup sunflower seeds, sprouted
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin seeds, sprouted
  • 1 1/2 cup of chunky applesauce
  • 1/4 cup of yogurt
  • 1½ tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 3 tbsp za’ atar

Instructions:

Combine all ingredients together in large bowl, adding more herbal tea or water to the mixture so it is the consistency of pancake batter.  Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let sit in dark warm place for 24-48 hours. When ready heap a couple of large spoonfuls of mixture onto food dryer sheets or  cookie sheet.  Spread evenly to about 1/4 of an inch thick. The secret of spreading the thick mixture is to use a wooden spatula that you keep dipping in water.  Dry thoroughly, 110 degrees or less, to preserve the lactobacillus. When done it will still be flexible, so it is easy to bend and break into crackers.  Enjoy.

 

 

Herbal Tinctures: Getting or Giving the Right Dose

tincturesHerbal tinctures are the backbone of Western herbalism.  Generally, herbal tinctures are made from herbs extracted with a combination of alcohol and water, although glycerine and vinegar can also be used.  They are widely available, economical to produce and use, compact enough to stock in considerable variety and have a good shelf life. They can be combined and are convenient to take.   Dried herbs start to loose their potency after 6 months yet tinctures can last up to 10 years or more.  As a primarily Traditional Chinese Medicine herbalist, I mostly rely on concentrated decoctions, but in some cases when I am working with aerial parts of  plants, or herbs that could benefit from the effects of alcohol, increasing circulation, tinctures are more appropriate.

This posting is based on tinctures made using the weight to volume method.

Understanding dosage rates are important in achieving therapeutic outcomes.  I find that if someone isn’t responding to an herbal formula then analyzing their dosages can be helpful.

As a starting point most commercially available herbal tinctures indicate the weight to volume ratio.  For example, if the label states that it is a 1:5 extraction, this indicates that 1 gram (weight) of herb is equivalent to 5 milliliters (volume) of liquid.

A tincture formula will state the herb and the ratio of herb (by weight) to solvent (by volume), and the % alcohol (ethanol) in water.

Having this information is crucial in understanding the amount of herb that you are recommending or taking per dose.  Furthermore, this information is required by law to appear on the label. along with the serving size suggestion, which we will discuss further on.

In trying to communicate dosage equivalencies I have developed the following chart based on weight to volume ratios.  The side column indicates the common ratios and the top row indicates the volume of tincture consumed (in milliliters).  For example, if you took 1 milliliter of liquid made at a ratio of 1:2 then you would be ingesting a half of a gram of herb.

Tincture Dosage Equivalencydosage ratioSuggested Use:  Different companies have different suggested dosage rates.   Some companies suggest taking a dropper full and others recommended taking a range of drops as a serving size, for example, 20-60 drops.  When a dropper full is suggested the amount consumed depends on the size of the bottle and dropper.  When the suggested dosage on the bottle indicates a number of drops per dose, the amount consumed depends on the viscosity of the liquid.  Since this can change from one company to the next the best we can do is to have an understanding of some equivalents  recognizing that this is an approximation:

  • 20 drops = 1 ml
  • Dropperful from a one-ounce bottle—30 drops
  • Dropperful from a two-ounce bottle—40 drops
  • 5 ml = 1 teaspoon
  • A one-ounce bottle holds approximately 30 ml, 6 teaspoons, 30 dropper full, and 1,000–1,200 drops.

For example if using the suggested serving of 40 drops, and 20 drops = 1 milliliter, then you are taking approximately 2 milliliters of a 1:5 tincture and getting approximately .4 grams of herb per dose.  Most commonly it is recommended to take the tincture two to three times a day, so using this same example you  would be consuming between .8 and 1.2 grams of herb per day. Knowing the actual amount of herb that is recommended on a daily basis will help with putting the this into context.  Below is a partial list of recommended daily dosage of some common herbs.

Examples of dosages of some common herbs*:

Herb Daily Dosage
Angelica archangelica 3-9 grams
Ashwagandha 3-12 grams
Astragalus 6-15 grams
Black Cohosh 3-9 grams
Burdock 3-10 grams
Codonopsis 9-30 grams
Dandelion 9-30 grams
Dang Gui 3-15 grams
Echinacea 3-9 grams
Grindelia 3-6 grams
Hawthorn Berry 6-12 grams
Lemon Balm ½-6 grams
Motherwort 10-30 grams
Oregon Grape Root 3-9 grams
Passion flower 3-9 grams
Skullcap 3-9 grams
St. Johns Wort 3-9 grams
Uva Ursi 3-6 grams
Valerian 3-6 grams

* Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra

In some circles there has been a discussion that the use of alcohol potentizes the action of the herbs, therefore less herb is needed.  Furthermore, the synergistic action of herbal combinations or formulas also increases effectiveness requring less herb.  These are great discussions but I work with aspiring herbalists who are often confused as to how to determine or convert tinctures to actual grams of herbs.  I hope that this helps and would encourage you to take a moment to actually consider that you might not be taking enough herbs to be effective.

Related blog post:  https://herbalgoddessmedicinals.wordpress.com/category/herbal-preparations/

Up coming blog:  How to make tinctures using the weight to volume method.

 

 

More Than Medicinal: Herbal Love Medicine

I recently finished teaching a wildcrafting class on medicinal herbs of Central Oregon. This year I incorporated other cultural uses of plants, in particular, focusing on “Love Medicine”.love   Native peoples used plants, not only as medicine, but also for their ability to affect an outcome. Daniel Moerman, author of Native American Ethnobotany, offers a compilation of ethnographies with over a hundred stories of tribal use of plants including ceremonial, hunting, witchcraft and love medicine.

The term love medicine was used for plants that were often suggested by tribal healers, elders or through the oral transfer of information to have powers beyond their medicinal attributes. Both men and women would use various plants as love charms to lure potential suitors or hold the attention of a “special person”.   In researching this topic it is a bit murky how the plants were utilized. In some cases special perfumes were prepared, in others, rituals were conducted with specific plants. In the book Plains Apache Ethnobotany by Julia A. Jordan people spoke about tribal members who specialized in preparing “love medicines”. In this book, the author describes the use of perfumes that were worn during certain times and specific places. In Daniel Moerman’s book he briefly describes how various plants were used or prepared. As contemporary herbalism as evolved over the last century, many of these spirit-based uses are being lost to us. With that in mind, here are some plants surrounding Central Oregon and how they were used as “love medicine”.

Aquilegia formosa

Aquilegia formosa

Various species of columbine were used as Love medicine. Western Columbine (Aquilegia formosa) was used by the Thompson Indian’s who used it as a charm for women “to gain the affection of men”. The Pawnee along with the Ponca’s used the crushed seeds of columbine, as a love charm also used columbine as love medicine.

larkspur

Delphinium menzieessi

Larkspur, (Delphinium menziessi)- a plant that was toxic to livestock and considered poisonous ironically was used for love medicine. The Thompson tribe’s women used it “to help them obtain and hold the affection of men”, although it wasn’t clear on how it was utilized.

MeadowrueMeadowrue, of which Central Oregon has a few species was not used by local tribes but was used by the Potawatomi as both hunting and love medicine. The seeds were mixed with tobacco by and smoked by men when going to call upon a favorite lady. Meadowrue, (Thalictrum occidentale), was used by the Thompson as a poultice on open wounds for healing. Meadowrue’s root contains berberines, one of the few plants aside from Oregon Grape Root to contain that particular constituent. It was used to loosen phlegm, as blood medicine, and as an analgesic. The powdered fruits were mashed into a paste with water and used on the skin and hair.

spreading-dogbane-apocynum-androsaemifolium-01

apocynum-androsaemifolium

Spreading Dogbane (Apocynum androsaemifolium)-although considered toxic was used extensively by Native Americans as love medicine. The Okanagan-Colville tribe chewed the leaves and the juice, as well as, smoked the dried leaves as an aphrodisiac (Not advised). If you break a spreading dogbane stem or leaf, you will see that the plant contains a bitter, sticky, milky white sap. The sap contains cardiac glycosides that are toxic to humans. The root also contains a potent cardiac stimulant, cymarin. These toxic compounds help protect spreading dogbane from grazing animals. Despite its toxicity, the plant has been used medicinally for a variety of ailments. However, this plant is best enjoyed for its beauty and not as a medicine. Native Americans used the tough fibers of this and other native dogbanes to make threads and cord.

Platanthera leucostachys_Mono Lake Cty Park_2002-07.05

Platanthera leucostachys

Bog Orchid (Platanthera leucostachys)-a plant we recently identified in the Ochoco Mountains, was used extensively by the Thompson tribe as a wash for various joint and muscle aches. It was used in the sweat lodge for rheumatism. Women “hoping to gain a mate and have success in love” used the Bog Orchid as love medicine as a wash. Although I could find no report of its toxicity, it was only used externally, so beware.

arrowhead

Sagittaria latifolia

Arrowhead, (Sagittaria latifolia) which is found in northern Jefferson County and on the west side crest of the Cascades was used as love medicine by the Thompson is usually found at the margins of ponds or marshes. The enlarged rounded starchy tubers from the plant form at the ends of underground plant runners (rhizomes). When dislodged from the mud, these tubers will float to the surface. They are edible, and may be boiled or baked and eaten as a potato-like food. Native Americans harvested and consumed these tubers, which in some areas were known as wapato. The Thompson spoke about its use as a love charm and for witchcraft.

pineappleweek

Matriciaria disoidea

Pineappleweed (Matriciaria disoidea)- was used by native peoples ranging from Alaska to Montana. A close relative to German Chamomile it had similar uses for digestion and fevers.   Native peoples used the aromatic plants as perfume, sometimes mixing them with fir or sweet-grass and carrying the mixture in small pouches to concentrate the fragrance. Pineappleweed, provided a pleasant smelling insect repellent, and the fragrant dried plants were used to line cradles and stuff pillows.  The Okanagan-Colville buried the tops of Pineappleweed mixed with human hair to prevent loved ones or relations from going away.

prairie smoke

Geum triflorum

Prairie Smoke or three-flower avens (Geum triflorum)-is in the rosaceae family; so that tells us that it probably has astringent actions. Avens were used by many native peoples ranging from toothache remedies, fevers, antidiarrheal, gastrointestinal and as a gynecological aid. Primarily the roots were used. Several tribes used it for love medicine, including the Iroquois, who used the compounded roots as an emetic to vomit and cure themselves of love medicine. The Okanagan-Colville used and infusion of the roots as a love potion by a woman who wanted to win back the affection of a man. Mathew Woods wrote about it in his book The Earthwise Herbal: A Complete Guild To New World Medicinal Plants. He spoke about the roots of avens containing phenols, tannins and essential oil, along with noting that he felt Prairie Smoke has an affinity to the female system: the latter for Stagnant blood .

sierra shoot star

Dodecatheon jeffreyi

Last but not least Sierra Shooting Star or Tall Mountain Shooting Star (Dodecatheon jeffreyi) was used as love medicine by the Thompson tribe. Women used the flowers “to obtain the love of men and to help them control men”.

This is just a small sampling of the vast number of plants that were utilized. As the profession of herbalism evolves in North America there is greater and greater emphasis being put on evidenced based medicine and a movement away from traditional knowledge along with the reduction in the number of the plants that are used in commerce. Despite this tendency towards retraction, my hope is that we continue to keep love 2plant stories, and other cultural values which plants offer, alive.

Traditional Chinese Medicine: Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and alternatives to Viagra

I recently saw my first client with ED and spent time researching how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) approaches working with this condition.  Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence occurs when a man has consistent and repeated problems sustaining an erection. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or keep an erection firm enough to have sexual intercourse. It is also sometimes also referred to as impotence.   Several studies have looked at the prevalence of ED including one, the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, that reported that ED is increasingly prevalent with age. At age 40, approximately 40% of men are affected. The rate increases to nearly 70% in men aged 70 years.  Age was the variable most strongly associated with ED, although there are emotional and physiological reasons attributed including: diabetes, obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, endocrine diseases, lifestyle, diet, neurological and nerve disorders, medications, drug abuse, anxiety and depression. Additionally men may have difficulty obtaining or maintaining erections after various forms of cancer treatment. Surgery and radiation therapy to the pelvic area, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and various medications may all significantly impact a man’s ability to obtain or maintain an erection. Viagra is the leading medication prescribed for ED, although as with all medications,  it is not without its associated side effects:

  • HeadacheUntitled1
  • Flushing in the face, neck, or chest
  • Upset stomach, indigestion
  • Abnormal vision
  • Nasal congestion
  • Back pain
  • Muscular pain or tenderness
  • Nausea

If considering options than Viagra, such as those explored below, it would be advised see a TCM trained specialist.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) considers that the strength or weakness of men’s sexual function is associated with the energy of certain internal organs, including the kidneys, liver and heart. The Kidneys are one of the major organs to support the body’s sexual function by storing essence (Jing), controlling human reproduction, growth and development. Essence or Jing rules the production of sperm. The heart plays an important role in erection and arousal. Kidney essence is classified as yin, while qi is yang, yet they depend on each other to maintain a dynamic balance, if out of balance it can result in ED/impotence. Excessive sexual activities and frequent masturbation can deplete the kidney essence.

The Ming Men (located on the middle of the lower back) is an essential part of traditional Chinese physiology. Called the “Gate of Life,” it holds the Genuine Yin and Yang of the body from which all substances and functions develop. The term Ming Men refers to one of the body’s two kidneys, where the male’s “essence” is stored. In Kidney Deficiency cases, warming the Ming Men and Kidney Yang are necessary to balance the body.

index4Men’s sexual function disorders have been strongly associated fast paced life styles. This state of chronic stress restricts the flow of the qi through the Liver channel which travels through the pubic area and reproductive organs. When the Liver is affected by stress and the Liver channel is blocked then qi cannot flow smoothly leading to sexual dysfunction and disorders.

The process by which the penis becomes erect is complex, involving not only the nerves, muscles, blood vessels, and other tissues in the penis itself, but also includes factors such as emotion, lifestyle and general health. During arousal nerve impulses are sent to nerves in and around the penis, which cause an increase of blood flow into that organ, causing it to become firm and erect. If there is insufficient blood the penis is unable to achieve erection.

The Heart plays a crucial role in erection, orgasm and ejaculation. In TCM the ability to have an erection and ejaculation depend on the communication between the heart and kidneys. The Heart-Qi needs to descend to communicate with Kidney-Qi. Vice versa, Kidney-Water needs to ascend towards the Heart and contain Heart-Fire, the coordination between the descending of Heart-Fire and ascending of Kidney-Water ensures a normal sexual cycle in men. During the excitement phase of sexual response the Minister Fire within the Kidneys is aroused and flows up towards the Pericardium and Heart: for this reason the person becomes flushed in the face (the complexion is a manifestation of the Heart) and the heart rate increases during sexual excitation. With orgasm and ejaculation, there is a downward movement of Qi, which releases the accumulated Minister Fire downwards: in order for this to occur normally the downward movement of Heart-Qi is crucial. If there is deficiency of Minister Fire within the Kidneys it will result in decreased libido and ED or impotence in men. If Heart-Qi and Heart-Blood are deficient or not descending to communicate with the Kidneys, there may be ED, impotence or premature ejaculation.

tongue blood stasisThere are several other common patterns in ED including blood stasis and damp heat. In cases of Blood Stasis, the flow of energy (called Qi) and Blood is blocked or obstructed in the lower abdomen preventing needed blood flow to create and maintain an erection. This condition often presents with signs of a tight and tender to palpitation lower abdominal area. Treatment will focus on breaking the stagnation in the lower abdomen, returning the proper flow of Blood though the affected area.

Another reason for ED or impotency is the presence of damp heat. Whenindex5 damp heat accumulates it acts creases stagnation or impedes the free flow of Qi. There are many causes of damp heat including unresolved health issues, unresolved low-level pathogens, and or excessive alcohol intake. Signs that point to the presence of damp heat include itching, pain, and swollen prostate, sweating in the genitals, heaviness and aching in the lower limbs, greasy yellow coating on tongue. Treatment includes clearing heat and nourishing any underlying deficiencies.

In determining treatment for ED it is important to utilize the four basic techniques of assessment: questioning, smelling/listening, palpitation and inspection. Furthermore the constitution of the client is taken into account at the same time as TCM pattern differentiation. The following is a summary of pattern differentiation taken from Giovanni Maciocia and Shen-Nong.com, as well as, several other authors.

Primary Patterns:

Kidney Deficiency:

  • Weakness of Life-Gate Fire/Ming Men
  • Deficiency of Kidney Yang Deficiency
  • Deficiency of Kidney Yin Deficiency
  • Damage of the kidneys by fear

Damp Heat:

  • Downpour of Damp Heat into the Lower Burner
  • Damp Heat in Lower Burner
  • Damp Heat in Liver-Gallbladder Channel

Blood Deficiency/Stagnation:

  • Liver-Blood Deficiency
  • Heart and Gallbladder Qi Deficiency
  • Heart-Blood Deficiency
  • Damage of the heart and spleen
  • Blood Stasis

Qi:

  • Liver Qi Stagnation

Untitled2Weakness of Life-Gate Fire-The Gate of Life or Ming men is (located on the middle of the lower back) is an essential part of traditional Chinese physiology. Called the “Gate of Life,” it holds the Yin and Yang of the body from which all substances and functions develop. Along with the Yin-Yang theory, one of the most fundamental principles in Chinese medicine is that of the “Three Treasures.” The Three Treasures consist of jing (essence/potential energy), qi (energy/function), and shen (spirit or spirits). In terms of understanding the Ming Men the concepts of jing and qi are primary. Original Qi is stored in an energetic center called Ming Men. The relationship between the Kidney organ-system and Ming Men is defined by the relationship between the elements of Water and Fire, or Kidney and Heart as explained above. Strengthening Jing and the Life-Gate are often the first approach when working with ED/Impotency.

  • ED/Impotence
  • Seminal discharge, white/cold
  • Dizziness/vertigo
  • Tinnitus
  • Pale complexion,
  • Cold extremities
  • Listlessness of spirit
  • Weak aching lower back and legs
  • Frequent urination
  • Pale Tongue with white coating
  • Deep thready pulse

Formulas:

  • Wu Zi Yan Zong Wan (Five Ancestors Teapills)
  • Zan Yu Dan (Procreation Elixir)
  • Right-Restoring Pill combining with Procreation Elixir
  • Jin Suo Gu Jing Wan (Golden Lock Teapills) Kidney Yin and Yang deficiency with leakage of fluids creating instability at the Gate of Life.
  • Cong Rong Bu Shen Wan (Cistanches Tonify Kidney Pills)
  • Er Xian San (Two Immortals Teapills) regulates the chong and ren channels
  • Ge Jie Da Bu Wan (Gecko Tonic Teapills)

Deficiency of Kidney Yang symptoms: Yang is responsible for our physiological functions and energy. A deficiency of Kidney Yang is an internal condition results in cold and weakness, along with ED or impotence. A deficiency of Kidney Yang indicates a deficiency in the “Life Gate” or Ming Men. This coldness results in the lower libido, ED or Impotence. It is

  • ED/Impotence
  • frequent clear urination,
  • cold limbs,
  • dizziness,
  • tinnitus,
  • fatigue,
  • lower back weakness
  • Deep-Weak pulse
  • Pale tongue

Formulas:

  • You Gui San (Right side Replenishing teapills)
  • Wu Zi Yan Zong Wan (Five Ancestors Teapills)
  • Jin Gui Shen Qi San (Golden Book Teapills)
  • Ba Ji Yin Yang Teapills (Morinda Pills to Balance Yin and Yang)
  • Huan Shao Dan Wan (Return to Spring Teapills)
  • Ge Jie Dan Bu Wan (Gecko Tonic Teapills)

Deficiency of Yin Deficiency

  • ED/Impotence
  • Dizziness
  • Scanty urination
  • Night-sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Tinnitus
  • Floating-empty pulse
  • Red tongue w/o coating

Formulas:

  • Zuo Gui Wan (Return Left Pill)
  • Zhi Bai Di Huang Wan (Eight Flavor Rehmannia Teapills) with deficient heat
  • Liu Wei Di Huang San (Six Flavored Teapills)

Damage of the kidneys by fear-Fear can shock or injure the Kidney-Adrenals, along with leading to the disordered movement of qi.

  • ED/impotence
  • soft erection
  • timidity
  • tendency to doubt and suspicion
  • palpitations
  • susceptibility to fright
  • restless sleep
  • thin and slimy tongue coating, string-like
  • thready pulse.

Formula: Huan Shao Dan Wan (Return to Spring Teapills)

Downpour of Damp Heat into the Lower Burner

  • ED
  • Premature ejaculation
  • Sweatiness of the scrotum
  • Heavy aching lower limbs
  • Thirst
  • Bitter taste
  • Dark burning urine
  • Yellow slimy coating on Tongue
  • Pulse is Slippery and rapid

Formula: Long Dan Xie Gan Tang (Gentian Liver-Draining Decoction

Damp Heat in Lower Burner

  • ED/Impotence
  • Difficult-painful urination
  • Deep yellow urine
  • Itching of genitals
  • Urethral discharge
  • Sticky-yellow coating on tongue, with red spots on root
  • Slippery pulse

Formula: Long Dan Xie Gan Tang (Gentian Liver-Draining Decoction

Damp Heat in Liver-Gallbladder Channel

  • ED/Impotence,
  • Difficult-painful urination
  • Rash external genitalia
  • Irritability
  • Sticky-yellow coating on tongue, with red spots on root
  • Wiry pulse

Formula: Long Dan Xie Gan Tang (Gentian Liver-Draining Decoction

Liver-Blood Deficiency

  • ED/Impotence
  • Dizziness
  • Blurred vision
  • Depressed mood
  • Insomnia
  • Pale tongue
  • Choppy pulse.

Formula:

  • Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang Jia Wei (Peony and Licorice Teapills)
  • Si Wu Tang (Dang Gui Four)

Heart and Gallbladder Qi Deficiency

  • ED/Impotence
  • Premature ejaculation
  • Depressed mood
  • Timidity, sighing
  • Insomnia
  • Palpitations
  • Easily startled
  • Pale tongue
  • Weak pulse

Formula: Da Bu Yuan Jian

Heart-Blood Deficiency

  • ED/Impotence
  • Palpitations
  • Dizziness
  • Depressed mood
  • Insomnia
  • Pale tongue
  • Choppy pulse

Formulas:

  • Gui Pi Tong (Ginseng and Longan Combination)
  • Si Wu Tang (Dang Gui Four)

 Damage of the heart and spleen

The Spleen is the source of Blood production along with ensuring its flow within the vessels. If the spleen is operating properly then it transports and transforms sufficient nutrients for plentiful heart blood. Vise versa, according to the five-element theory, the Heart is the mother of the Spleen. If there is deficiency of Heart Blood or Qi it impairs the function of the Spleen to transport and transform. This domino effect will impede the Spleens ability to transport sufficient nutrients to keep Blood flowing in the vessels (ability to achieve and maintain erection).

  • Inability to achieve and/or maintain erection
  • Lassitude
  • Palpitations
  • Poor memory
  • Restless sleep
  • Poor appetite/eating habits
  • Colorless facial complexion
  • Thin and slimy tongue coating, pale tongue,
  • Fine or choppy pulse.

Formula:

  • Gui Pi Tong (Ginseng and Longan Combination)
  • Spleen-Restoring Decoction

Blood Stasis-Surgery, cancer, radiation and chemotherapy can potentially result in creating stagnation of blood to the perineum, which can impede the flow of blood and qi.

  • Prickling pain in testes
  • Pain or distention in chest and hypochondria
  • Stabbing pain
  • Dark complexion
  • Dry skin
  • Purplish dark tongue
  • Thready, uneven pulse

Formulas:

  • Xue Fu Zhu Yu Tang (Stasis in the Mansion of Blood Decoction)
  • Wen Jiang Tang Wan (Warm Cycle teapills)

Liver Qi Stagnation-Normal flow of liver qi ensures that all emotional processes are in harmony and blood is flowing sufficiently. If there is a stagnation of liver qi then this can result in the lack of nourishment to tendons including genitalia.

  • ED/impotence
  • Depression
  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Discomfort of the chest and stomach
  • Distension and oppression of the hypochondriac region
  • Poor appetite/eating habits
  • Loose stool
  • Thin tongue coating
  • String-like pulse.

Formula:

  • Xiao Yao San (Bupleurum and Dang Gui Formula
  • Jai wei xiao yao san (Bupleurum and Peony Formula) clears deficient heat
  • Chai Hu Shu (Disperse Vital Energy in Liver), for liver qi stagnation and Liver Blood Stasis

Traditional Formulas used for ED/Impotence:

Ge Jie Da Bu Wan (Gecko Tonic Teapills), Qi, Yang, Blood and Jing deficiency

Symptoms:

  • Weakness or pain in low back knees
  • Joint pain and stiffness
  • Difficulty walking
  • Weakness, fatigue, exhaustion, listlessness
  • Weak voice, pale face
  • Spontaneous sweating
  • Occasional chills and feverishness
  • Dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, hearing loss
  • Forgetfulness, poor memory,
  • Frequent urination, nighttime urination
  • Edema,
  • Chronic diarrhea w/undigested food, abdominal distention, poor appetite
  • Cold limbs, cold intolerance
  • Decreased sex drive, impotence
  • Shortness of breath, wheezing, shallow breathing aggravated by exertion, shallow breathing aggravated by exertion, chronic persistent cough
  • Palpitation
  • Insomnia

Jin Suo Gu Jing Wan (Golden Lock Teapills), Kidney Yin and Yang Deficiency creating instability at the Gate of Life

Symptoms:

  • Chronic leakage of fluids, spermatorrhea, nocturnal emissions, premature ejaculation, impotence,
  • Urinary frequency, night urination, urinary dribbling or incontinence
  • Fatigue, weakness, listlessness
  • Excessive sweating
  • Weakness and rapid fatigue in muscles, sore and weak low back and limbs
  • Chronic watery diarrhea
  • Tinnitus

Wen Jiang Tang Wan (Warm Cycle teapills) * deficiency and cold in Chong and Ren channels causing blood stasis

Symptoms:

  • Five palms heat
  • Dry lips and mouth
  • Dry skin or hair
  • Fatigue, weak or cold limbs
  • Impotence
  • Pain in the testicles
  • Urinary incontinence

*primarily used for women in the category of warm the menses and dispel blood stasis, but can be used for spermatorrhea, erectile dysfunction, orchialgia, seminal insufficiency.

Supplementary herbs and formulas:

  • Wu Chi Pai Feng Wan (Black Chicken White Phoenix Pills)
  • Tonic wine: soak red deer antler, ginseng roots, lycii berry and schizandra in rise wine. Take 1 tsp 3 times a day, especially for winter.
  • Planetary Herbs: Damiana Male Potential
  • Ashwagandha
  • Shilajit
  • Damiana
  • Yohimbe
  • Ginseng

Moxibustion and Qi Gong: In cases of Kidney deficiency that require warming, moxibustion can also be performed at index6these acupuncture points. The moxibustion treatment involves the burning of a herb, Ai Ye-mugwort, to warm and circulate the energy in the local area, strengthening the Life Gate fire.

Qi Gong has specific movements to strengthen the Gate of Life (http://www.funwithqigong.com/2009/07/open-and-move-from-the-gate-of-life/)

References:

http://www.shen-nong.com/eng/exam/specialties_menimpotence.html

https://www.jcm.co.uk/liver-gallbladder-based-erectile-dysfunction-treatment-by-chinese-medicine-part-1.html

http://www.altmd.com/Articles/TCM-for-Erectile-Dysfunction

http://maciociaonline.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-treatment-of-male-problems-in.html

http://www.itmonline.org/5organs/kidney.htm

http://www.tcmtreatment.com/images/diseases/impotence.htm

http://www.theacupunctureclinic.co.nz/male-sexual-dysfunction-by-will-maclean/

Holiday Herbal Gifts: Liquors, Infusions and Bitters

IMG_2058One of my favorite activities is researching, experimenting and making alcohol infused liqueurs.  Alcohol has historically been used as medicine throughout the world.  The Romans infused herbs in wine as a regular medicinal therapy due to alcohol’s ability to extract the active compounds of any number of herbs.  The ‘Water of Life’ as alcohol came to be known was refined all over Europe (known as such due to it being safer to drink than disease-ridden water).  Alcohol was used as a way to preserve, extract and even direct the action of the herb in the body.  Alcohol is stimulating and warming, as such it increases blood circulation throughout the body.  In Traditional Chinese Medicine moderate alcohol consumption is said to calm the mind, is relaxing, dispels worry, invigorates blood, eliminates obstructions from the channels, harmonizes and warms the Stomach, and expels cold.  Alcohol infusions, or liqueurs are typically infused with fruit, herbs, spices, flowers and nuts. Liqueurs are usually not aged for long after the ingredients are mixed, but may have resting periods during their production to allow flavors to mix together. Although liqueurs are made with distilled spirits, I also use wine, vermouth, sake or sherry as my base.  One of my favorite infusions was with sherry, the result was rich, complex and warming.

Many of my recipes call for the use of a sweetener.  I tend to use honey, although depending on the type of images1honey it can add an additional flavor to your liqueurs so a simple syrup make with organic sugar can be substituted.  When using honey, I make it into a simple syrup following the recipe below. I tend to make my alcohol infusions slightly sweet to preserve the medicinal aspects of the infusion. When sweetening the herbal infusion it is better to start with less than wait a day or two, taste again and adjust.  If not you can easily end up adding too much sweetener, which of course you can’t undue.  Sugar based simple syrup:  In a saucepan combine 1 cup of sugar or honey with 1 cup water. Heat the mixture and stir until dissolved. Allow to cool.

I have been working with herbs for so long I have a fairly good idea of the flavors that they impart.  If you do not have this experience, I would start by following a recipe until you feel more comfortable experimenting.  Here is a partial list of the herbs that I use:

  • Allspice berries (Pimenta Dioica Merr.)
  • Angelica root and seeds (Angelica Archangelica L.)
  • Anise seeds (Pimpinela Anisum L.)
  • Burdock (arctium lappa)
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
  • Cardamon seeds (Elettaria Cardamomum Maton)
  • Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum Cassia)
  • Cloves flower buds (Eugenia Carophylata Thunb.)images4
  • Codonopsis (Codonopsis pilosula, Dang Shen)
  • Coriander seeds (Coriandrum Sativum L.)
  • Damiana (Turnera diffusa)
  • Dang Gui (angelica sinensis)
  • Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)
  • Fennel seeds and tops (Foeniculum Vulgare Mill.)
  • Gentian root (Gentiana Lutea L.)
  • Goji Berries (Lycium barbarum)
  • Hawthorn berries ((Crataegus oxyacantha)
  • He Shu Wu (Polygonum multiflorum)
  • Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)
  • Hyssop leaves (Hyssopus Officinalis L.)
  • Juniper berries (Juniperus Communis L.)
  • Lemon Balm leaves (Melissa Officinalis L.)
  • Logan Berries (Euphoria longan)
  • Peppermint leaves (MenthaxPiperata L.)
  • Rose petals
  • Schinsandra (Schisandra chinensis)
  • Star anise seeds (Illicium Verum Hook)
  • Tumeric root (Curcuma Longa L.)
  • Vanilla seeds (Vanilla Planifolia Andr.)

I often use whiskey or brandy as my base distilled spirit in that they tend to impart a warming energy and have a great base flavor.  If the herbs that I am using have a strong flavor, for example infusions with angelica, I would use vodka or grappa as my base.

Angelica Liqueur-Angelica has a long history of use in colds, lung congestion and digestion.

Step #1-2 Tbsp. fresh or dried angelica root (Angelica archangelica)
2 fl oz vodka

In a small glass jar combine the angelica root with 2 fl oz vodka. After two weeks filter through a coffee filter.

Step #2-

1 tsp. dried marjoram
2 green cardamoms
1/16 tsp. ground allspice
1/16 tsp. ground star anise
1/16 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/16 tsp. ground coriander
2 fl oz vodka
In a grinder combine the cardamom seeds, allspice, star anise, cinnamon stick and coriander seeds. Grind just until the herbs are reduced in size, but not a powder. Place in a glass jar or bottle and add 2 fl oz vodka. After one week filter through a coffee filter.

Step #3-

1/2 cup simple syrup
1 cup vodka
Combine with sugar syrup (adjusting to your sweetness level) and 1 cup vodka.

Step #4-Add small portions of the angelica root extract to the liqueur until you get a suitable flavor. Check the flavor after 2 months. If necessary add some more sugar syrup, vodka, or angelica extract.

Longevity Elixir

This infusion is based on tradition Chinese herbs that are taken for strengthening our immunity and overall health.

1 oz, He Shou Wu, (fo ti) dried

1 oz, Eleuthro

1 oz, Hawthorn Berries

1 oz, dried Reshi mushrooms, broken up

1 oz, Goji berries, chopped

1 cinnamon stick, broken

1/2 oz, Angelica Sinensis,(Dang Gui), chopped

5 red dates, pitted and chopped

1/2 of peel of tangerine, chopped

Simple syrup to taste

Combine all ingredients together with 1 liter of brandy.  Let sit for 1 month, strain add simple syrup if needed. Take a swig a day.

Beet, Hawthorn Berry and Rose Petal Liqueur

Rose petals have high tannin content so the infusion needs to sit for a while before it is palatable.

½ cup of rose water

1 ½ cups of filtered water
4 cups of rose petals from a highly scented rose  or 1 cup of dried rose petals

¼ cup of grated beets

¼ cup of hawthorn berries, slightly ground
1 liter of grappa or vodka
Simple syrup to taste
Place the rose petals, grated beets and hawthorn berries in a clean jar, add alcohol, close and keep in a cool dark place for at least 2 weeks. Strain and then add simple syrup to taste, you can always add more later, so less is probably better. Keep it for least 3-6 months before using.

Anise, Lemon Verbena and Rosemary  Liqueur

2 and 1/4 cups dry anise liqueur (raki, ouzo)

2 and 1/4 cups sweet anise liqueur (anisette, sambuca white)

3 sprigs thyme

3 sprigs rosemary

1 Tablespoon dried lemon verbena

6 sage leaves

6 mint leaves

1/4 of peel orange

Combine herbs, orange peel along with dry and sweet liqueurs together and age for 2 months. Strain and bottle.

Sage, Basil and Bay Liqueur

4 cups of grappa or vodka

6 bay leaves, crumbled

1 sprig of rosemary

10 mint leaves, chopped

1 Tablespoon chamomile flowers

10 basil leaves, chopped

15 fresh sage leaves, chopped or 1 Tablespoon dried

3 cloves

3 saffron filaments

Simple syrup to taste

Combine herbs and alcohol for 20 days. Strain, add sugar syrup to taste. Age for 4 weeks before consuming.

Highland Heather Bitters
“In Scotland bitters were traditionally drunk before meals, especially breakfast, ‘for the purpose of strengthening the stomach, and by that means invigorating the general health’.

1/2 oz gentian root chopped

2 Tablespoon heather flowers

1/2 oz coriander seed, crushed

¼ peel of tangerine

1 Tablespoon chamomile flowers

4 cloves (whole)

1/2 of cinnamon stick

1 Tablespoon glycerin

1 bottle whiskey

Combine all ingredients with whiskey, leave for ten days, then strain and bottle. In this case you do not want to add simple syrup because the bitter taste is what activates your digestive system to work efficiently.

Black Sambucus (Elderberry)

1-liter alcohol, your choice, I prefer brandy for this

4 cups of ripe elderberries or 2 cups of dried berries

2 tsp anise seed

1 tsp licorice root

1 strip of lemon peel

1 tsp glycerin (for smoothness)

Simple syrup to taste

Put the elderberries and alcohol in blender and blend until elderberries are chopped, add anise, licorice and lemon peel. Transfer to Mason jar and then sit for 30 days. Stain and add simple syrup and glycerin.

Damiana Liquor

Damiana leaves have been used as an aphrodisiac and to boost sexual potency by the native peoples of Mexico, including the Mayan Indians and is used for both male and female sexual stimulation, increased energy, asthma, depression, impotence and menstrual problems.

1 oz Damiana leaves

2 Tbsp Saw Palmetto berries

2 Tbsp Angelica Root

1/2 Tbsp Vanilla pods

3/4-1 cup Honey

1 liter Whiskey

Soak all ingredients for one week, and then strain through coffee filter and save. Re-soak herbs in 1 cup distilled water for another week, then strain. Heat water mixture too slightly warm and then add honey to the hot liquid. After honey until dissolved, take off heat and let cool. Now add this to the first whiskey liquid. Age the final liquid for at least a month

Read more: http://www.ancient-origins.net/human-origins-science/alcohol-me

l

Making Holiday Herbal Goodies: Soaks, Sprays, Scrubs and Masks

It is that time of year again when I teach a series of herbal gift-making workshops.  Since many of you following this blog are not local I thought I would share some of my favorite recipes, along with, some ideas for packaging. Feel free to experiment with any of these recipes, if you don’t have the exact ingredients or can think of something else that would enhance the action of the formulas.

cello bagSoaks:  The first set of recipes are for a variety of herbal soaks.  For packaging,  the ingredients in these recipes can be divided into large press n’ brew tea bags or  jars with an attached cotton muslin tea bag, which can then can be reused.  Mountain Rose Herbs has several of types of bags available.  I prefer the press n’ brew bags.  I divide the recipe into 4 bags, iron them shut and then combine these bags into transparent cello bags tied with ribbon and labeled with kraft paper tags.

Bright Eyes Herbal Tea Soakseye bags

4 Tablespoons Chamomile flowers

3 Tablespoons Chrysanthemum flowers

2 Tablespoons Peppermint Leaf

3 Tablespoons Sage Leaf

4 drops lavender oil

Measure everything into glass jar, shake and divide between three large press n’ tea bags.

Instructions:  Cover tea bags with boiling water, let cool until slightly warm then apply.

foot soaksDetoxing and Warming Foot Soak

1/4 cup dead sea salts

1/4 cup Epsom salts

2 Tablespoons dry mustard

2 Tablespoons dried ginger root

2 Tablespoon cinnamon stick, broken up

2 T. of Dong Quai root (angelica sinensis)

1/4 cup of Mugwort leaf

1 Teaspoon Cayenne power

4 Tablespoons of dried Dandelion Root

Put herbs into mason jar, cap and shake.  Package in jar with muslin bag or divide into 5 press n’ brew bags.

Instructions: Put herbs in large pot with 2 quarts of water. Bring to boil, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add to foot basin with enough cold water to allow feet to soak. Soak until cool.

Skin Soothing Milk Bath Soaks

¼ cup of goat milk powder

1 cup of powdered dry milk

½ cup of non-GMO corn starch

1 cup of oatmeal ground finelybath bags

¼ cup of dead sea salt

2 Tablespoons of rose petals

2 Tablespoons of lavender flowers

10 drops of rosemary essential oil

10 drops of carrot seed essential oil

10 drops of neroli essential oil

20 drops of rose hips extract

Combine oatmeal in blender and grind until powder, then combine the ingredients in blender and blend until essential oils are incorporated. Package in jar with muslin bag or divide into 8 press n’ brew bags.

Instructions: Put bag into bath and then fill with hot bath water, let cool until comfortable temp to enter bath.

bottleSprays:  The next set of recipes are facial and aftershave sprays.  I use bottles with spay atomizers from Specialty Bottle.  Their two ounce bottles are ideal for this use.  I also use kraft paper tags for labeling these as well.

Healing Facial Toner

1 Tablespoon comfrey leaf

1 Tablespoon chamomile flowers

1 Tablespoon Calendula petals

1 Tablespoon Rose petals

2 oz of witch hazelfacial spray

2 oz of vodka in jar

10 drops of carrot seed essential oil

5 drops of lavender essential oil

5 drops clary sage essential oil

5 drops of cedarwood essential oil

Combine herbs with witch hazel and vodka in jar, shake well and let sit in warm space for 1 week. Strain herbs and combine remaining essential oils, shake well and bottle.

Anti-aging Facial Spray

2 Tablespoon of aloe gel

1 Tablespoon of witch hazel

3 oz of cucumber hydrosol

6 drops of carrot essential oil

4 drops of clary sage essential oil

2 drops of geranium essential oil

3 drops of frankincense essential oil

Combine all ingredients together in jar, shake and then fill bottles.

imagesBay West Indies Aftershave Splash

This essential oil is distilled from the Bay Rum Tree (Pimenta racemosa). It is a common scent in men’s aftershave products.

1 cups of witch hazel extract

1 ounce of rum

zest from half organic orange

1/2 cinnamon stick

6 peppercorns

1 sprig of rosemary

1 tsp of corianderafter_shave

1 bay leaf

3-cloves

3-whole allspice

1 tsp teaspoon aloe vera gel

1 tsp of glycerin

15-25 drops of Bay West Indies Essential Oil, depending on preference

Combine all ingredients in 1 quart mason jar, cover and shake well.  Let sit for 2 weeks, shaking daily.  Strain and fill bottles.

jarsScrubs:  The internet is filled with recipes for scrubs but I wanted to offer up a few of my favorites.  In terms of packaging I use a 4 ounce jar with swing-top lid, which is convenient when using in a shower.  There are many places to download printable labels, but this is one site I often use http://putitinajar.com/crafts/printables/  I use full sheet shipping labels and then print out my labels.  There are numerous examples of labels available at craft supply stores for this purpose if you don’t want to trouble yourself with downloading and printing.

Seaweed Detox Salt Scrub

2 tablespoons comfrey root

2 tablespoons Calendula flower

1 ½ cup of sesame oil

scrubs¼ cup of bladderwack seaweed powder

½ cup of kelp powder

2 cups of dead sea salt

½ cup of Rhassoul clay

¼ cup of castor oil

10 drops of rosemary essential oil

10 drops of lavender essential oil

Combine the comfrey and calendula herbs with the sesame oil, heat on low for 20 minutes.  Remove from heat, let cool and strain out herbs.  Combine remaining ingredients, mixing well.  Add more clay if necessary to make it the consistency of peanut butter.

Chocolicious Body Scrub

1/4 cup of Epsom salt

1/4 cup of Dead Sea Salt

2 Tablespoons of cocoa powder

½ tsp of cinnamon

1 Teaspoon of vanilla

3 Tablespoon of melted coconut oil

Combine all ingredients together mixing well, then fill jars.

facial masksMocha Facial Scrub

1 cup sugar

2 Tablespoon of cocoa powder

2 Tablespoon of finely ground coffee

1/3 cup of oatmeal powder*

5-7 Tablespoons of sesame oil

2 Tablespoon of Aloe Vera Gel

1 teaspoon of Vit. E oil

Combine all ingredients together mixing well, then fill jars.  * put oatmeal in blend and grind finely

blue jarMasks:  Ever since I was a young girl I loved using facial masks.  Over the years I have enjoyed exploring the full range of masks from fresh fruits to honey to clay.  Here are two of my favorites. For packaging I use hexagon shaped jars, along with kraft paper tags.

Goat Milk and Clay Pore Refining Masque

1/2 cup of French Clay

4 Tablespoon of slippery elm powder

4 Tablespoon of dried goat’s milk powder

2 Tablespoon of comfrey root powder

2 Tablespoon of rose powder

1 Tablespoon of sandalwood powder

20 drops of carrot seed essential oil

10 drops of clary sage essential oil

10 drops of lavender essential oil

5 drops of cedarwood essential oil

Combine all in blender and blend until well mixed.  Fill jars

Instructions: Moisten 1 Tablespoon of the masque with milk, yogurt or water. Apply to face and leave on until dry, rinse and pat dry.

Rose, Frankincense and Sandalwood Facial Mask

2 Tablespoons Rose powder

2 Teaspoons Sandalwood powder

2 Tablespoons Frankincense powder

1/2 cup of sugarfacial mask

3 Tablespoons cosmetic white clay

½ cup of sesame seed oil

5 drops of black pepper essential oil

6 drops of coriander essential oil

2 Teaspoons of Vit E.

Mix all ingredients together in bowl and mix well.  Mixture should be thick adding more clay if necessary. Fill jars.

Happy Holidays

Resources for herbs and Tea Bags:

https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/

http://www.oregonswildharvest.com/owh/browse/bulk_herbs,_teas_and_spices

For bottles:

http://www.specialtybottle.com/

For cello bags and other packaging:

http://www.papermart.com/HOME

Happy Holidays to you and yours

 

 

 

Consumer Beware: The Rampant Under Dosing of Herbal Products

The world of herbal supplements is often confusing and making heads or infusiontails out of dosages, etc. takes time, research and a bit of math. Many folks buy herbs from their local health food stores, through the Internet or from alternative care providers. More often than not, they follow the instructions that appear on the bottle. I have analyzed many formulas that clients have brought to me and I am always struck by the fact that what they are taking is far below the recommended daily therapeutic dosage. As an herbalist, I contend that if folks are not seeing the intended effects it is either due to under dosing or not addressing the root cause of their condition. For the purposes of this article I am going to concentrate on the issue of under dosing and although I know that this topic is potentially controversial, it nonetheless needs to be examined.

I believe that under dosing is rampant due to the following: the true cost of taking herbs therapeutically, herbal profit margins and the risk adverse nature of supplement manufactures. To illustrate my point we will look at several forms of existing herbal products in relationship to recommended daily therapeutic dosages.

Let’s start by picking an herb. An average recommended dose of Vitex (Chaste Tree) berry is 3-6 grams a day of dried ground herb, as stated in several prominent books on herbalism. For this analysis I will use this as my baseline for establishing a daily therapeutic dose. When we look at using tinctures several leading tincturesbrands provide Vitex tinctured at a 1:5 ratio (a standard ratio that many manufactures use, I believe based on profit margins). This measurement is an herb to liquid ratio, meaning that 5 milliliters of liquid equals one gram of herb. If you want to take the therapeutic dose of 3 grams of Vitex a day, you would need to take 1 teaspoon of tincture, three times a day (1 tsp is approximately 5 milliliters). When we look at the cost of this dose, a standard 1-ounce tincture bottle would last two days (1 oz equals 6 teaspoons). At an average cost of $10 a day this would cost $40 a week. If you take the upper range of the recommended dose – 6 grams, you would need to double the amount of tincture equaling an ounce of tincture a day at $10 a day this would be approximately $70 per week.

Most tincture bottles provide recommendations based on a drop dosage. In the case of Vitex a review of several manufacturers suggest an average of 30 drops (30 drops equals approximately 1 ml although this depends on the viscosity) three times a day. There are several ways to look at this, but the simplest is to remember that 5 milliliters of a 1:5 ratio equals one gram of Vitex. If this amount is taken 3 times a day you would be taking 3 milliliters of Vitex or less than 1 gram of herb which is far below the low range of the 3-6 grams a day. Some herbalists would make the case that tinctures are a more concentrated form of herbal preparation due to their bio-availability of chemical constituents thereby lower dosages are appropriate. This might indeed be true and depends on your frame of reference. Either way it behooves us to take the time to do the research and math to figure out the actual dosage that you are taking or recommending.

When we look at the comparison of therapeutic dosage in relationship to herbal capsules under dosing becomes even more apparent. For examplecapsules many leading manufactures supply Vitex at 400 mg per capsule (400 mg equals .4 gram) with a recommend daily dose of 2 to 3 capsules a day. In doing the math this translates to consuming .8 gram of Vitex at 2 capsules a day and 1.2 gram of Vitex at 3 capsules a day, far below the recommended daily therapeutic dose. In fact to get to 3 grams you would have to consume 8 capsules a day and at 6 grams a day you would have to consume 16 capsules a day.

I have done similar analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicine, medicinal mushrooms and standardized herbal supplement formulas only to find that the dosages on the bottle fall far below therapeutic recommendations. So what is the answer?

  1. Invest in a comprehensive book on herbs that lists therapeutic dosages in grams for example Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra.
  2. Determine the therapeutic dose for a given herb.
  3. Read the information in the box (Supplement Facts panel). What is the recommended serving size? What is the suggested dosage?
  4. Do the math. Compare the supplements recommended daily dose to the therapeutic dose.
  5. Look for fluid extracts which are tinctured at 1:1 or 1:2 ratio or other concentrated forms of herbal preparations.

 

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